2004

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0466  Wednesday, 18 February 2004

[1]     From:   Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 09:55:58 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0438 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II

[2]     From:   Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 16:34:34 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0454 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 09:55:58 -0500
Subject: 15.0438 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0438 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II

I agree with Tom Rutter that caution is warranted in regards to our
certainty that Elizabeth, in her recorded remarks to William Lambarde
six months after the Essex rebellion, was definitely referring to a
dramatic performance. The passage, written down by the antiquarian
William Lambarde to record the conversation is said to have taken place
at the Tower of London when Elizabeth was examining a compendium of
records kept there. The passage goes:

"so her Majesties fell upon the reign of King Richard II, saying, "I am
Richard II, know ye not that?

W. L.: Such a wicked imagination was determined and attempted by a most
unkind Gent. the most adorned creature that ever your Majestie made

Her Majestie:  He that will forget God, will also forget his
benefactors; this tragedy was played 40tie times in open streets and
houses."

Almost everyone assumes the "unkind Gent" is Essex, and this seems
highly probable to me. I can just barely see the case for the
construction of the remarks that Rutter makes-that the tragedy refers to
the events of the rebellion. But I confess that the "40tie times" seems
an odd phrase to me in that context, and I think it is more plausible to
read the remarks as referring to some sort of performance put on
repeatedly in streets and houses. And I think there is a _possible_ link
here with the mysterious play at which Essex was supposed to have
applauded so ostentatiously. Until someone discovers such a play or
records of it, however, these ideas are all speculative, as are theories
identifying the play with Shakespeare's (which we at least can be
certain did exist!).

Best,
Hugh Grady

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 16:34:34 -0000
Subject: 15.0454 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0454 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II

 >Isn't it an overstatement to say that the play "kick-started" the Essex
 >rebellion?

Probably.  "Sounded the fanfare" would have been better.

Peter Bridgman

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