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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: February ::
The Essex Rebellion and Richard II
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0481  Thursday, 19 February 2004

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Feb 2004 17:21:52 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0466 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II

[2]     From:   Tom Rutter <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Feb 2004 21:24:46 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0466 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 18 Feb 2004 17:21:52 -0000
Subject: 15.0466 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0466 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II

I'm not sure just how relevant this citation is to the current debate,
but there's a poem attacking Walter Ralegh (beginning "Watt, I wot well
thy overweening witt," written sometime between 1603 and 1618) which has
a stanza explicitly linking Essex to +Richard II+:

         Renowned Essex, as he past the streets,
              Woulde vaile his bonnett to an oyster wife,
         And with a kinde of humble congie greete
             The vulgar sorte that did admire his life:
         And now sith he hath spent his livinge breath,
         They will not cease yet to lament his death.

Cf. RII:

             Off goes his bonnet to an oyster-wench;
        A brace of draymen bid God speed him well
        And had the tribute of his supple knee,
        With 'Thanks, my countrymen, my loving friends;'
        As were our England in reversion his,
        And he our subjects' next degree in hope.

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Rutter <
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Date:           Wednesday, 18 Feb 2004 21:24:46 -0000
Subject: 15.0466 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0466 The Essex Rebellion and Richard II

Hugh Grady is right to say that an interpretation of Elizabeth's
reference to 'this tragedy' as alluding to the rebellion itself is
probably pushing it a bit - the point I was trying to make is the one he
echoes in the first sentence of his post, that 'caution is warranted in
regards to our certainty that Elizabeth, in her recorded remarks to
William Lambarde six months after the Essex rebellion, was definitely
referring to a dramatic performance'.  It's far from clear what 'this
tragedy' means in the context.

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