2004

Old Journals

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0471  Wednesday, 18 February 2004

From:           R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 09:13:20 -0600
Subject: 15.0450 Old Journals
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0450 Old Journals

 >As I lurch towards retirement, I look around my office at shelves of old
 >journals going back to the 1960s or before--_Shakespeare Quarterly_,
 >_Renaissance Quarterly_, Modern Language Review_, and _PMLA_, to list
 >only the longest runs. Can anyone suggest a suitable home for these--an
 >institution somewhere which would welcome a contribution? Or have times
 >changed enough that my only choice is the recycle box?

Newer campuses of expanding university systems are in need of these.
Students at such places can easily find themselves caught in a mindset
that does not  include much that has gone before: thoroughly, very
thoroughly, modern.

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Exciting New E-Resource: York Plays

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0470  Wednesday, 18 February 2004

From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 17:32:58 -0000
Subject: 15.0440 Exciting New E-Resource: York Plays
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0440 Exciting New E-Resource: York Plays

Terrific resource. Many thanks.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Peacham Sketch of Titus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0468  Wednesday, 18 February 2004

[1]     From:   Kimberly Woosley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 09:12:12 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus

[2]     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 15:31:25 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus

[3]     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 13:11:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus



[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kimberly Woosley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 09:12:12 -0600
Subject: 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus

I'm completing a dissertation on this very topic.

The account books of drapers and milliners in the Records of Early
English Drama include references to sums "paid to the painter for the
painting of players faces" and also "for the blacking of the faces."
Before cosmetics became the dominant way to represent racial difference,
actors would wrap themselves in black fabric.

Shakespeare's plays sometimes hint at processes of representing race
onstage-Othello's bosom is described as "sooty," his face "begrimed," as
if his blackness were something that could be put on and removed-perhaps
using a preparation of burnt cork.   A number of early modern dramas
actually incorporate racial impersonations involving cosmetics into
their plots-Webster's The White Devil, Rowley's All's Lost By Lust, and
later in the seventeenth century, Berkeley's The Lost Lady and Brome's
The English Moore.

I don't know if you're interested in the courtly context, but the
epilogue to Ben Jonson's The Gypsies Metamorphosed confesses that the
gypsies skins were darkened using "an ointment/ Made and laid on by
Master Wolfs appointment./  It was fetched off with water and a ball,/
And to our transformation this is all (ll. 1389-1392).  Wecker has a
recipe for a cosmetic water using green walnut shells that will turn the
skin black, and also advises readers how to "take off that blackness."

We know Queen Anne and her ladies used blackface disguise to perform in
The Masque of Blackness, and James I also kept blacks at his court.
Tokson, Hall, and others have found that some were used in courtly
performances or processions. I haven't found references to black actors
on the popular stage, however.

Kim Woosley Poitevin
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 15:31:25 -0000
Subject: 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus

There is, of course, the account of Queen Anne and her courtiers
appearing in black makeup for the Masque of Blackness; that they chose
not simply to carry black vizards not only posed a problem for Jonson in
arranging a transformation at the masque's end, but, according to one
report, posed a problem for the Spanish Ambassador in kissing the
ladies' black hands.

David Lindley

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 13:11:54 -0500
Subject: 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0456 Peacham Sketch of Titus

Thomas Berger, et al., An Index of Charaters in Early Modern English
Drama Printed Plays, 1500-1660, offer a brief bibliography under
Moor(s).  There are cross references to Africa/African(s), and Negro(s).
  Since there were many Blacks in early modern London, some may have
made it on to the stage.

Bill Godshalk

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Teeth or Arms? A Titus Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0469  Wednesday, 18 February 2004

From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 10:36:54 -0500
Subject: 15.0444 Teeth or Arms? A Titus Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0444 Teeth or Arms? A Titus Question

Leaving aside the vexed question of what sort of proofreading went on in
the shop of John Danter, "Armes" in Titus at TLN 1430 ("And Lauinia thou
shalt be imployde in these Armes," [Q1]) is not necessarily an error.
See OED under the second form of the word as a noun:  "II. Elliptical
senses. (Only pl. exc. in 9.)  6. The exercise or employment of arms;
fighting, war, active hostilites. to bid arms (obs.): to offer battle.
to carry arms: to wage war. to appeal to arms: see APPEAL v. 6b.   c1374
CHAUCER Anel. & Arc. 1 Fiers god of armes Mars the rede. c1590 MARLOWE
2nd Pt. Tamburl. II. ii, An hundred Kings, by scores, will bid him arms.
1662 DRYDEN Astr


Banned Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0467  Wednesday, 18 February 2004

From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Feb 2004 10:07:08 -0500
Subject: 15.0453 Banned Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0453 Banned Shakespeare

 >He can disown her, yes, but he
 >can't force her to marry against her will, and that's part of what's got
 >him so upset." -- does not square with my impressions of Medieval and
 >Renaissance
 >marriage laws and customs.

Juliet's alternative is shown to us as clearly as you could hope for in
the plight of Julia in Two Gentlemen of Verona. I always think of these
plays as altar egos, and as Two Gentlemen also takes place in the land
of make believe, where utterly impossible fantasies are set in
historical times and places, it is the only possible model for a make
believe alternative for a make believe Juliet.

Clifford Stetner
CUNY

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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