2004

The outward habit by the inward man

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0352  Monday, 9 February 2004

From:           David Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Feb 2004 13:51:35 -0600
Subject:        The outward habit by the inward man

Can anyone clear something up for me?  Regardless of who wrote these lines-

Opinion's but a fool, that makes us scan
The outward habit by the inward man.

     SIMONIDES
     Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act 2, scene 3

-isn't the meaning best expressed by changing the "by" in the second
line with "for," meaning "for clues about"?   Doesn't this quote mean
that we are fools to get our opinions merely from a superficial look-as
in don't (be so fast to) judge a book from its cover)? Otherwise, I
can't see that these lines mean anything, unless the "inward man" is
doing the scanning, in which case what could THAT mean.

Clueless in Pentapolis
David Cohen

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Giulio Romano

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0351  Monday, 9 February 2004

From:           Norman Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 Feb 2004 11:25:51 -0500
Subject:        Giulio Romano

Hi, all,

Those of us who have chuckled over the years at Shakespeare's use of
Guilio or Julio Romano as the "rare Italian master" who made the statue
of Hermione for The Winter's Tale, may need to laugh out of the other
sides of our mouths.

The NYTimes on 1/30 ("Inside Art") reported the sale to the Kimbell
Museum of a portrait bust of Isabella d'Este by "Romano, one of the
leading sculptors of Renaissance Italy."  "That it is a bust of a woman
makes it particularly rare."

The Times includes a picture of the bust, and it is incredibly detailed
and life-like.  But this is not Giulio Romano, illustrator of the bawdy
sonnets of Aretino.  This is Gian Cristoforo Romano (b. before 1470, d.
1512).  A Google search for images by this sculptor turned up another, a
bust of Beatrice d'Este.

Apparently, Shakespeare had heard of him as a sculptor who made
portraits of women.

Here are some particulars about him:

Romano was a pupil of Bregno in Rome, was first employed in Ferrara and
travelled to Pavia to work on the Certosa. He precipitated a change in
Lombard sculpture, influenced by his own courtly style indebted to Roman
imperial art.

The delicate and quattrocentesque bust depicts the Renaissance princess
from Ferrara, [Beatrice] who was betrothed at five and married at
fifteen as still a child. Presumably she is portrayed during her
betrothal, because the inscription terms her daughter of Ercole d'Este.
She tried to compensate for an unsatisfactory marriage by transforming
Milan into a cultural centre of great distinction but her influence,
like her life, was transitory.

On the bust Romano acknowledges but restrains the fussy Lombard taste in
the decorative detail of the costume and head-dress. Her intricate
coiffure terminates in long a braid, neatly bound with ribbons, which
falls down her back like a plumb line.

---------------------------------
Gian [Giovanni] Cristoforo Romano

(b Rome, c. 1465; d Loreto, 31 May 1512). Italian sculptor and
medallist. He was the son of Isaia da Pisa. Some scholars have followed
Vasari in suggesting that he was trained by his father or by Paolo
Romano, but Isaia stopped work and Paolo died too early to have had any
significant influence on him. It is likely that he studied with Andrea
Bregno, who worked in Rome from 1446 to 1506. He may have been in Urbino
before 1482, working at the Palazzo Ducale with the Lombard master
Ambrogio d'Antonio Barocci. Several doorframes in the palazzo have been
attributed to him. He then probably went to the Este court at Ferrara.
In 1490 he carved a portrait bust of Beatrice d?Este (Paris, Louvre),
the daughter of Ercole I d'Este, Duke of Ferrara, for her betrothal to
Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan. The attribution of this bust derives
from a letter of 12 June 1491 from Isabella d'Este, requesting that
Ludovico send Gian Cristoforo, who had done Beatrice's portrait, to
Mantua to work for her. The bust is inscribed with the imprese of a
sieve surrounded by a diamond ring. The sieve was a symbol of Ludovico,
the diamond of Ercole; entwined they suggest marriage and the hope of
fertility. This bust is the sculpture most securely attributed to Gian
Cristoforo and, with his medals, provides the basis for the assessment
of his style.

--Best,
Norm

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How Like You This?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0349  Monday, 9 February 2004

[1]     From:   L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Feb 2004 06:49:48 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0345 How Like You This?

[2]     From:   Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Feb 2004 11:04:24 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0345 How Like You This?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Feb 2004 06:49:48 -0600
Subject: 15.0345 How Like You This?
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0345 How Like You This?

David Schalkwyk (on Cape Town production of AYLI) wrote,>

 >One of the aspects of the production that made me think anew
 >about 1.2 was a WWF-style wrestling scene that was unexpectedly, and
 >shockingly, violent.

I was reminded by this of a production of AYLI presented years ago in
London with Roland (Ronald?) Pickup as Orlando.  The wrestling scene
ended with a very audible knocking of heads of the opponents that made
the audience gasp - suddenly shocked back  from the illusion presented
to concern for the actor presenting it.  I was sitting on the front row
and had a close view of Pickup's eyes dangerously rolling. There was a
moment there when....

          L. Swilley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Feb 2004 11:04:24 -0500
Subject: 15.0345 How Like You This?
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0345 How Like You This?

Indeed it was Stan Wojewodski (as someone also kindly reminded me in an
email).

I do not remember an RIII under his direction but I do remember a
somewhat peculiar production of Marlowe's Edward II, though I'm not sure
if it was under Wojewodski's tenure.

Not questioning you by any means, Alexandra and I thank you for posting
Wojewodski's name.

Mari Bonomi

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Richard III and Soames Forsythe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0350  Monday, 9 February 2004

From:           L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Feb 2004 07:19:23 -0600
Subject:        Richard III and Soames Forsythe

Al Magary wrote,

 >Soames Forsyte,...although often detestable, was in the first series in
 >2002 a
 >fascinating character in the style of some Shakespeare protagonists like
 >Richard III:  What *will* he do, what fresh outrage will he commit next?

An interesting association - although Richard never seems to suffer
Soame's struggle between his better and worse motives.  Especially as
Olivier plays him, Richard is having great fun; Soames seems always
miserable in his determination to assert his "Forsythe-ness".  In the
Masterpiece Theater's interpretation, Soames has an affection and
concern for his sister, a respect for his mother and a genuine love for
his father - and Irene is much more to him than a "property."  He seems
to fight off his instinct to love, thinking it a weakness, or as an obex
to a success required of him by the family tradition. (At least, that is
how he is being portrayed in the Masterpiece presentation; the novels
themselves seem  less kind to this character, more one-dimensional,  and
less appreciative of the TV-Soames' suffering. )

          L. Swilley

_______________________________________________________________
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Bear-Baiting

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0348  Monday, 9 February 2004

[1]     From:   Sebastian Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Feb 2004 11:55:51 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0339 Bear-Baiting

[2]     From:   Reg Grouse <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 06 Feb 2004 23:02:57 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0339 Bear-Baiting

[3]     From:   Diana Price <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Feb 2004 12:11:32 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0320 Bear-Baiting

[4]     From:   Jim Lake <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Feb 2004 08:10:03 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0339 Bear-Baiting


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sebastian Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Feb 2004 11:55:51 -0000
Subject: 15.0339 Bear-Baiting
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0339 Bear-Baiting

A good starting-point might be Erica Fudge's _Perceiving Animals: Humans
and Beasts in Early Modern English Culture_ (2000). There was also an
excellent article by Jason Scott-Warren in a recent _Shakespeare
Quarterly_: 'When Theatres Were Bear-Gardens, or, What's at Stake in the
Comedy of Humours'.

Seb Perry.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Reg Grouse <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 Feb 2004 23:02:57 +1100
Subject: 15.0339 Bear-Baiting
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0339 Bear-Baiting

There is, unless my memory is false, which would not be unusual, there
are scenes in Polanski's, Macbeth showing some examples of bear-Baiting.

Cheers, Reg

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Diana Price <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Feb 2004 12:11:32 -0500
Subject: 15.0320 Bear-Baiting
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0320 Bear-Baiting

In her article "The Masters of the Bears in Art and Enterprise" in
Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England (1991), S.P. Cerasano refers
to "making arrangements to replenish their stock" of dogs (citing PRO,
SP38/7 of 14 Nov. 1604) and also to profits made from "the export and
sale of mastiffs."

Diana Price

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Lake <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Feb 2004 08:10:03 -0600
Subject: 15.0339 Bear-Baiting
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0339 Bear-Baiting

There are several sections on bear-baiting and related topics in Joseph
Strutt's THE SPORTS AND PASTIMES OF THE PEOPLE OF ENGLAND, originally
published in 1801 and reprinted in 1903 and 1968.  There are some
interesting reports from the Sixteenth Century and some great
illustrations too.  There's also a brief entry in Campbell/Quinn
READERS' ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SHAKESPEARE.

Jim Lake

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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