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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: January ::
Bartolozzi Engravings
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0072  Monday, 12 January 2004

[1]     From:   D Bloom <
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        Date:   Friday, 9 Jan 2004 11:21:39 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings

[2]     From:   Colin Cox <
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        Date:   Friday, 09 Jan 2004 13:20:45 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings

[3]     From:   John Briggs <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 02:51:07 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0037 Bartolozzi Engraving

[4]     From:   Edward Brown <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 05:51:47 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <
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Date:           Friday, 9 Jan 2004 11:21:39 -0600
Subject: 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings

I confess that I'm having some trouble visualizing this scene (Marlow's
death). We have three men at a table in a row, their backs to the bed
and Frizer in the middle. We have a bed presumably parallel to the table
with a man (Marlowe) lying on it. The man "leans forward" in order to
bludgeon (?) the middle man and strikes some kind of minor blow to his
head. The man then whirls about and stabs him in the eye. Ladies and
gentlemen of the jury it just doesn't work.

Try it.

My feeling is that a great deal has been left of the coroner's report.

There are two primary awkwardnesses: the fact that Frizer was in the
middle (so that he could hardly fight Marlowe in any fashion without the
other two clearing out of the way and him getting free of the table and
the bench he'd been sitting on); the fact that Marlowe attacked a man at
a table while lying on a bed.

It may be that modifying one would solve both problems. If Marlowe stood
up from the bed, made whatever movement was necessary to place him next
to Frizer, and swung downward at his head, Frizer (hearing Marlow move)
might have also stood up, turned around, ducked out of the way of the
blow, pulled his dagger and killed Marlowe. That I can picture.

Alternatively, if Marlowe had remained at least semi-recumbent on the
bed, swung at Frizer in a drunken and inept fashion (hitting him on the
lower back, perhaps), Frizer might have turned around where he sat --
perhaps meaning only to scare off Marlowe -- and more or less
accidentally hit him in the eye. Or so his defense counsel might suggest.

Since this has came up, has anyone actually worked out how (if you were
either staging this as a play or debating it as a criminal case) it
could fit the coroner's report?

Cheers,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin Cox <
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Date:           Friday, 09 Jan 2004 13:20:45 -0800
Subject: 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings

Thomas Larque wrote:

 >This sounds a bit pedantic to me, and it isn't necessarily right either.

You're right it's too pedantic. QED.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 02:51:07 -0000
Subject: 15.0037 Bartolozzi Engravings
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0037 Bartolozzi Engravings

I think I owe everyone an apology:  I had completely forgotten that I
actually possessed a copy of the catalogue of the important 1991
quatercentenary exhibition "Drawings by Guercino from British
Collections" held at the British Museum (and by implication had seen the
actual drawings!)  The two drawings in question that were engraved by
Bartolozzi are nos. 69 and 72 in the catalogue, and are entitled
"Studies for the 'Assassination of Amnon at the Feast of his
Half-brother Absalom' (1628)" - see II Samuel 13:28.  The somewhat
unedifying Biblical scene is represented in contemporary dress.  There
are two other composition studies (not in the Royal Library).  The
Windsor Castle, Royal Library, inventory numbers are 2399 and 2398.  The
best advice for eBay auctions is: "caveat emptor".

John Briggs

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Brown <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 05:51:47 -0600
Subject: 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0062 Bartolozzi Engravings

Pedantic, Thomas? I have examined the record of the Cornoner's Inquest
personally in Latin in the PRO and find absolutely no reference to
Marlowe's posture at the moment of the purported assault. The report
says that they came in from the garden, dined, afterwards exchanged
sharp words concerning "le recknynge" , laid down on the bed, and then
renewed the argument:

""usque horam sextam post meridiem eiusdem diei & tunc recesserunt a
gardino praedicto in Cameram ...& post cenam praedicti Ingramus &
Christoferus Morley locuti fuerunt & publicaverunt unus eorum alteri
diversa maliciosa verba..."

The whole report seems to me intent on establishing Frysar's posture
more than Marlowe's. He was of course, intent on proving his plea of
self defense. There were no independent witnesses in the room at the
time. The three men had their story and they stuck to it. No matter that
all three were liars, frauds and cheats. Just intuitively, I find it
hard to believe that such a hard wound , driving very precisely two
inches into the eye socket, could have been so casually administered
from a man sitting on a bench. I think they held him down on the bed and
drove the dagger into his brain.

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