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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: January ::
Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0089  Tuesday, 13 January 2004

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 13:34:53 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

[2]     From:   Ben Spiller <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 18:43:14 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

[3]     From:   Kathy Dent <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 18:50:30 +0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

[4]     From:   Diana Price <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 17:24:36 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Period

[5]     From:   Arthur Lindley <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 09:45:53 +0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 13:34:53 -0500
Subject: 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

There's Jean Agnew's Worlds Apart for starters.  A lot of work on this
topic was done in the later 1980s.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ben Spiller <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 18:43:14 -0000
Subject: 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

A reliable historical/cultural context for the study of Elizabethan and
Jacobean theatre as a commercial enterprise is Lisa Jardine's Worldy
Goods, in which the author views the entire period through a materialist
lens.  She does mention theatre as a commodity, but doesn't devote an
entire chapter to it; however, like I mentioned earlier, the thesis
provides a strong framework in which to place debates about the early
modern entertainment industry.  Also, the frontispieces of most printed
plays provide some clues as to who the texts were aimed at, as well as
to what was understood to sell a play in printed form.  For example,
does the front cover promote the name of the playwright(s), the title of
the play, the playing company, the patron, a star player, the number of
times the play has been performed, who the play has been performed
for...?  Perhaps looking at a number of printed plays themselves (their
covering pages in particular) would provide a useful starting-point,
before tracking down pamphlets and other printed material that
advertised theatrical performance.  Hope this helps in some way or other.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathy Dent <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 18:50:30 +0000
Subject: 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

David Frankel might try _The repertory of Shakespeare's company
1594-1613_ by Roslyn Lander Knutson, in which she refers to the function
of the repertory system as it relates to the commercial and marketing
aspects of play production.  Also by the same author is _Playing
companies and commerce in Shakespeare's time_, a more extensive study of
commercial considerations.

Kathy Dent

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Diana Price <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 17:24:36 -0500
Subject: 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

Re: David Frankel's query concerning "the theatre as a commercial
enterprise during the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods," I would suggest
William Ingram's "The Business Of Playing" (1992) and his "Economics of
Playing" essay in "A Companion to Shakespeare," ed. David Scott Kastan
(1999).  There's also "Business Profit and Business Practices in the
Elizabethan Theater," an article by James Forse in the fall 1990 issue
of The Journal of Popular Culture.

Diana Price

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Lindley <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 09:45:53 +0800
Subject: 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0067 Marketing during Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods

I assume he's looked at Andrew Gurr, _Playgoing in Sh's London_, _The
Shakespearean Stage_, and/or _The Shakespearian Playing Companies_?

Arthur Lindley

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