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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: January ::
Psychology of Gertrude
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0090  Tuesday, 13 January 2004

[1]     From:   Tom Pendleton <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 12:49:55 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0068 Psychology of Gertrude

[2]     From:   David Cohen <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 2004 19:24:33 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0068 Psychology of Gertrude


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Pendleton <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 12:49:55 -0500
Subject: 15.0068 Psychology of Gertrude
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0068 Psychology of Gertrude

I of course meant "genteel; give a goy a break.

TP

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Cohen <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 2004 19:24:33 -0600
Subject: 15.0068 Psychology of Gertrude
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0068 Psychology of Gertrude

 >>I think Tom Pendleton has it exactly right.  No need to negotiate!
 >>
 >>David
 >
 >Thank you. But I suspect our conversation may have become too gentile
 >for SHAKSPER.  I'll call you a bad name in my next post, if only to keep
 >my credentials valid.
 >
 >Best
 >Tom

Tom, hold your fire till we disagree on something substantive!  In the
meantime, can you or any other on this list educate me on purses:  What
was the value of the "purse" so often flung from one person to another
in the plays, as in "Here, take my purse."  I assume it was a purse of
coins, but what kind (always gold?) and of what value- surely varying
with the economic resources of the giver-but roughly what value in our
coinage?  I assume that purse tossing occurred in real-life, else whence
cometh the term "cutpurse." So then, did people carry lots of purses.  I
mean, after you tossed away one, what of your own needs for money, and
what if another worthy required a purse for a good deed?  Maybe good
deeds were so few and far between, there wasn't much need for many
purses. (I assume that a purse was never tossed to a lady.)

David

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