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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: January ::
NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0095  Wednesday, 14 January 2004

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 12:24:29 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0086 NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling

[2]     From:   Douglas Galbi <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 10:49:26 -0500
        Subj:   RE: NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling

[3]     From:   D Bloom <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 10:56:25 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0086 NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 12:24:29 -0800
Subject: 15.0086 NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0086 NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling

Hardy Cook quoted Frank Kermode on Stephen Orgel's book _Imagining
Shakespeare_:

 >The oddest of these chapters is ''The Pornographic Ideal,'' a study of
 >Giulio Romano, named by Shakespeare as the sculptor supposed to have
 >made the statue of Hermione in ''The Winter's Tale,'' though, as every
 >schoolchild knows, the artist of that name was not a sculptor. To this
 >old problem Orgel brings not so much a new solution as a sort of
 >collateral investigation of works actually produced by Giulio,
 >principally the obscene drawings he made for the engravings that
 >illustrated Pietro Aretino's pornographic poems on the sexual positions.

I though that the pictures came first and that Aretino's poems were
inspired by them, rather than the pictures being made to illustrate the
poems. Does anyone here happen to know?

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Galbi <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 10:49:26 -0500
Subject:        RE: NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling

"The main point on which Wells and Wood disagree as to interpretation of
fact happens to be one that is at present exercising many other
scholars. Very crudely, the question is this: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?"

While human brains have evolved to make binary categorizations (edible
or inedible? friend or foe?), scholars might try just a little more
effectively to stretch their fellow species-members' brain activities.
Understanding the sixteenth-century history of devotion to Mary, the
mother of Jesus, is important for appreciating Shakespeare's art. See
Section IV (pp. 82-112) of "Sense in Communication," available at
www.galbithink.org

If the appeal of Shakespeare's work to you depends on categorizing
Shakespeare as Catholic, Anglican, nihilist, or whatever, you really
aren't appreciating the greatness of Shakespeare's art.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 13 Jan 2004 10:56:25 -0600
Subject: 15.0086 NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0086 NYTimes.com Article: Avon Calling

Gary Kosinsky writes:

 >And Wells believes that the father's
 >own explanation of nonattendance at church was the true one: he
 >was afraid of exposing himself to arrest for debt.

Would this mean John Shakespeare spent most of his life holed up in his
home in Stratford?  If he was afraid of exposing himself to arrest for
debt by going to Church, why would he feel safe exposing himself
anywhere in a relatively small town?

And what does being arrested for debt mean?  Was there a debtor's prison
in Stratford?  And if there were officials responsible for arresting
people for debt, why wouldn't they simply have gone to John's house?"

To which I add: weren't you exempt from arrest for debt on Sunday? You
were in Pope's day (see "Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot," 11-13). Had this
changed in the intervening century?

Cheers,
don

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