Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: January ::
Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0129  Monday, 19 January 2004

[1]     From:   Al Magary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 15 Jan 2004 20:29:17 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography

[2]     From:   Mari Bonomi <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 16 Jan 2004 00:40:15 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography

[3]     From:   Tony Burton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 16 Jan 2004 10:40:49 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography

[4]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 17 Jan 2004 12:30:56 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Magary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 15 Jan 2004 20:29:17 -0800
Subject: 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography

Gabriel Egan (I think it was on the other side of all the >'s) wrote:

 >There is so much text already in HTML that the world is
 >more likely to lose some of its smaller spoken languages such
 >as Irish and Welsh than it is to lose its collective knowledge
 >of HTML.

I'd like to interject that HTML is merely coding on top of text: the
codes may be stripped, leaving plain ASCII text.  However, I'd agree
with one of the other writers that it's far better to apply HTML as a
preservative than MS Word.  Just try to see what's in a .doc without a
special viewer.

Cheers,
Al Magary

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mari Bonomi <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 16 Jan 2004 00:40:15 -0500
Subject: 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography

For those contemplating HTML rather than MS Word, might I suggest that
you not do what MS wants you to do and simply let MS Word convert your
words to HTML?  That is *not* standards based HTML and in fact contains
much bad code.  (Converting Excel into HTML produces even more horrific
code than MS Word; MS Frontpage though it is a webpage generating
program is replete with that same bad code.)

I'd recommend instead getting yourself a good text editing program (I
use Macromedia Homesite but there are many others out there, including
some nice shareware ones you can find via Cnet's downloads.com).  The
correct coding can be inserted using tools within the program and you'll
be much closer to "pure" HTML of the sort Gabriel Egan recommends we use.

Mari Bonomi

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Burton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 16 Jan 2004 10:40:49 -0500
Subject: 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography

Late word from Big Brother.  The NY Times this week has reported the
existence of computer industry concern over news of China's governmental
initiative to develop its own, apparently incompatible, computer
programming standards.  The size of their internal market, the US
distraction towards Islamism concerns, and the known deficiencies in the
programming systems we all have come to rely on, all shorten the time
frame for present standards to be placed under enormous pressure to
change, and all from a system that is at heart not an open one, but can
be expected to have "political" filters built in.  While we're asked to
invest in Mars, China is investing in Earth.  Does that say something to
anyone?

Whatever concerns I and others have already expressed about the wisdom
of abandoning print versions of WSB are brought into sharper focus and
more immediate practical relevance than any of us supposed when this
thread began.  Short-term economic considerations that ignored daily
human needs and activities as well as remote consequences destroyed the
USSR, leaving its survivor states a future of economic and ecological
decay and dependency on others.  The clever people who run the
institutions we value can learn by its example.

Tony Burton

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 17 Jan 2004 12:30:56 -0800
Subject: 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0116 Important Changes to the World Shakespeare
Bibliography

Sean Lawrence writes

 >Microsoft keeps extending HTML. As a result,
 >many pages are now not written in pure, standards-
 >ased, W3C approved HTML and may prove
 >unreadable in the future.

I would be less charitable and say that Microsoft keeps attempting to
break HTML so that everyone's documents will only be readable by those
using a Microsoft browser. I am grateful for Sean's pointer to the Opera
browser.

David Evett writes

 >My own experience with HTML is limited, and
 >suggests that to generate an HTML file that will
 >do things like footnotes you will need to spend
 >a lot of time learning a basketful of markup codes
 >and more time typing them in--precisely the sort
 >of extra labor, on top of the labor of finding the
 >right words, that the proprietary programs were
 >developed to save.

The sorts of things that Word can do with footnotes-- which amounts to
little more than saving the writer from numbering (and renumbering) them
manually-- can be done by any number of other software packages.  The
real saving in labour is when one uses personal bibliographical database
software that writes citation footnotes for you in any style, based on
bibliographical information keyed in manually or, more conveniently,
downloaded over the Internet from sources such as the Library of
Congress OPAC using the Z39.50 protocol.

In the humanities we have tended to be awfully slow at exploiting the
labour-saving possibilities of the new technologies. A trip to one's
university's computer centre can lead to discoveries that take months or
even years off the time needed for a large project.

Gabriel Egan

[Editor's Note: I summarized some information about Z39.50 compliant
bibliographic management software a few years ago.
http://www.shaksper.net/archives/2001/2625.html -Hardy]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.