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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: January ::
Will Shakespeare, the KJV and the Tabloids
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0138  Tuesday, 20 January 2004

From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Monday, 19 Jan 2004 06:13:34 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Will Shakespeare, the KJV and the Tabloids

SHAKSPEReans:

A member sent this to me off-list, and I find it remarkable that Frank
Zingrone has not *read* our comments about Will S and the KJV.  For if
he had he would have known that there were 50 known academic scholars
from Cambridge, Oxford and Westminster as well as a few men close  to
King James, including himself, who  were involved, and named, as I did
name them all in my book *Jesus: The Gospel According to Will* and cited
that fact here on SHAKSPER.

Maybe, just maybe, this is so erroneous in scope and content from known
scholarship because it appears to be from an online tabloid in Canada.
What have they got against Great Britain and the bard to allege such
misinformation?

Such follows:

Shakespeare, by god
Did the renowned Bard have a quill in the writing of the richly lyrical
King James Bible?
by Frank Zingrone

Toronto Star, Jan. 16, 2004

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1074166570889&call_pageid=968256290204&col=968350116795

The most widely read and respected book in the world was written by a
group of unknown persons. The King James Bible, a model force in the
development of English literature was created by a secret group of
unpaid artists and scholars.

In 1611, toward the end of the 1603 plague cycle in London (which
registered more than 11,000 deaths the first year and many more
afterward for eight years), the Authorized Version Of The Bible was
published, the work of several years and the product of "47 scholars"
split into groups who reported to a general committee under the aegis of
King James I of England (Scotland's James VI).

To this day, nobody knows who the translators, who started their work in
1604, were.

There has been much speculation about this group, code-named "The
Divines," by the king.

No evidence has ever been brought forward to name them individually.

Nevertheless, King James, the vain, posturing, artiste manqu

 

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