2004

Shakesbeer

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0797  Wednesday, 31 March 2004

From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 21:50:23 -0500
Subject: 15.0782 Shakesbeer
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0782 Shakesbeer

Isn't there a major brand called Falstaff?

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Bearman on Will

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0796  Wednesday, 31 March 2004

From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 21:05:18 +0100
Subject: 15.0753 Bearman on Will
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0753 Bearman on Will

A question that none of the biographers seems to have asked is why the
testament wasn't buried along with John's corpse in 1601 ....

"I John Shakespear have made this present writing of protestation,
confession and charter, in presence of the blessed Virgin Mary, my angel
guardian, and all the celestial court, as witness hereunto: the which my
meaning is, that it be of full value now presently and forever, with the
force and virtue of testament, codicil, and donation in cause of death;
confirming it anew, being in perfect health of soul and body, and signed
with mine own hand; carrying also the same about me; and for the better
declaration hereof, my will and intention is that it be finally buried
with me after my death.  Pater noster, Ave Maria, Credo.  Jesu, son of
David, have mercy on me. Amen."

Peter Bridgman

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Lincoln / Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0794  Wednesday, 31 March 2004

[1]     From:   Chris Coffman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Mar 2004 05:03:06 +1000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth

[2]     From:   Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 12:05:11 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth

[3]     From:   Marcia Eppich-Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 19:54:12 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Coffman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 2004 05:03:06 +1000
Subject: 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth

Harry V. Jaffa shrewdly observes in Shakespeare's Politics (The
University of Chicago Press), 1964, pages 4 - 5 "On the face of it, the
man who could write Macbeth so convincingly that a Lincoln believed it
to be the perfect illustration of the problem of tyranny and murder must
have known about politics; otherwise, the play could not have attracted
a man who admittedly did know."

 From memory, the David Herbert Donald biography of Lincoln also
contains good information on Lincoln's love for Shakespeare.

Regards,
Chris Coffman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 12:05:11 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth

I also heard from somewhere I can't remember or substantiate that his
favorite speech in all of the plays is actually Claudius's soliloquy in
III. iii. of Hamlet. A bit surprising to me actually but there you go.
And all this from a basically self-educated man.

Brian Willis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcia Eppich-Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 19:54:12 -0600
Subject: 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0778 Lincoln / Macbeth

Allan Axelrod wrote:

 >I was told recently that Abraham Lincoln was a Shakespeare enthusiast,
 >with Macbeth his favorite play--but my informant remembered this from
 >some forgotten source
 >
 >Does anyone know of some treatment of this?  They're a fine combination:
 >WS himself would have been proud to have written the Second Inaugural.

I actually have a file on Lincoln and Shakespeare. In March of 1863,
actor and writer James Henry Hackett sent Lincoln a copy of his newly
published book entitled _Notes and Comments upon Certain Plays and
Actors of Shakespeare_. On August 17, 1863 -- in the midst of the Civil
War, mind-Lincoln replied to Hackett's gift via a letter. Hackett had
the letter published as a broadside, and it was reprinted in several
newspapers. I found a copy of the letter printed in the September 20,
1863, edition of the New York Times. Part of the letter reads: "Some of
Shakespeare's plays I have never read, whilst others I have gone over
perhaps as frequently as any unprofessional reader. Among the latter are
Lear, Richard III, Henry VIII, Hamlet, and especially Macbeth. It is
wonderful." Lincoln goes on to say of Hamlet that he believes the
soliloquy "Oh my offense is rank" surpasses "To be or not to be." Makes
me wonder if Lincoln were having guilty feelings about the war...

There has been a good amount of treatment on Lincoln's love of
Shakespeare. I read that Lincoln was  rereading Macbeth just before his
assassination-I think I may have read that in Shakespeare Quarterly (?).
Esther Cloudman Dunn wrote a book (1939) called _Shakespeare in America_
and Chapter XIII is entitled "Shakespeare in the Thought of Some 19th
Century Figures: Emerson, Thoreau, Alcott, Whitman, Lincoln." It has
been some time since I read it, so I can't remember how much she treats
Lincoln specifically. Also, I have an article by James A. Stevenson
entitled "Abraham Lincoln's Affinity for Macbeth," but I must have
misplaced the publication information. You should be able to find it in
the MLA bibliography though. Lastly, there is an article from April 1904
in _Overland Monthly_ called "Abraham Lincoln's Knowledge of
Shakespeare" by Robert N. Reeves. These titles will give you a place to
start searching. There is much more out there.

It may be helpful also to note that Shakespeare's tercentenary of his
birth happened during the Civil War. A ceremony was held in New York and
a statue erected in Central Park. There's an article about it in the New
York Times-April 24, 1864, page 4.

I hope all this helps. Happy hunting,
Marcia Eppich-Harris

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Three Sons in Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0795  Wednesday, 31 March 2004

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 14:12:34 -0500
        Subj:   The Three Sons in Hamlet

[2]     From:   Jay Feldman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 18:08:58 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0784 The Three Sons in Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 14:12:34 -0500
Subject:        The Three Sons in Hamlet

Sean's ad hominem response will be noted but not responded to. He seems
not to have read the final paragraph of my last post:

"For what it's worth, I think Fortinbras puts on the pressure and then
waits for Claudius's Denmark to fall of its own weight, now that old
Hamlet is dead. It's a pretty clever device, potentially a kind of
revenge, and it is based on the old idea that patience can be the best
way to get even. In other words, he out-Hamlets Hamlet."

Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jay Feldman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 18:08:58 EST
Subject: 15.0784 The Three Sons in Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0784 The Three Sons in Hamlet

Jack Heller says: "...I don't believe the supposed reports of the
changes in Fortinbras's purposes, and I do believe the sounds of war
Hamlet, Osric, and Horatio hear as Hamlet is dying. ... Show us the text
indicating troops "returning battleworn and surely in need of resupply."
...Whatever one may say about Branagh's filming of Fortinbras's arrival,
it has some textual support."

Dear Jack, you are correct, nothing I said concerning the physical state
of Fortinbras' army (battleworn and in need of resupply) is textually
supported, however that was not the thrust of my question. What I want
to know is where is the logic of Fortinbras marching his army through
Denmark, fighting a war in Poland, and only then returning to attack his
real target of Denmark? "Hamlet" is a fiction and so anything goes, but
surely this does not make sense in real or imagined life.

As for the sounds of war heard by Hamlet, Horatio, and Osric, that is
Fortinbras' army marching by. The SD that mentions a "shot within" is
elsewhere a "shout within" and the "warlike volley" is apparently a
diplomatic protocol directed at the English ambassadors, at least that's
my reading of the line (5.2.356 Arden). Horatio asks "Why does the drum
come hither?" That seems to be another protocol announcing the entry of
a foreign prince, given the SD that can include a drum, colors, and
attendants.

That there is actually a battle for the castle in progress seems
unlikely given that Denmark is well armed and the castle well fortified.
Please remember we are told there are soldiers on the battlements with
drums, trumpets, and ordnance at the ready (5.2.267-74 ) and apparently
functioning given the SD at line 284. Nowhere can I find in anything
Fortinbras says an indication that he has conquered Denmark by arms or
even arrived with a warlike intention, rather, only sadness at the
dismal sight and a willingness to embrace his good fortune. I simply
don't believe there is textual support for a Fortinbras covert offensive
or that Branagh's depiction of his bloody arrival was in any way justified.

Jay Feldman

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Stylometrics

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0793  Wednesday, 31 March 2004

From:           R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 2004 12:15:47 -0600
Subject: 15.0785 Stylometrics
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0785 Stylometrics

 >they have overriding and unassignable imperatives and styles
 >of their own

Where'd they get them?

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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