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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: March ::
Which Lear
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0649  Thursday, 11 March 2004

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Mar 2004 08:14:20 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0634 Which Lear

[2]     From:   Bob Marks <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Mar 2004 15:07:05 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0634 Which Lear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Mar 2004 08:14:20 -0800
Subject: 15.0634 Which Lear
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0634 Which Lear

Hi Jack,

I use an unconflated text, and provide an exercise using two parallel
texts for the conclusion.  Since the reading that I use in my lectures
depends on a particularly conclusion, the exercise becomes an example of
how textual variants pose difficulties.

Yrs,
Sean.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Marks <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Mar 2004 15:07:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 15.0634 Which Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0634 Which Lear

If I were teaching Lear to students who had never read it, I think I
would want to start by having them read at least the 1605 anonymous
version of Leir and maybe Higgins Tragoedy of Cordilla in Mirror for
Magistrates. Then I would point out to them that in Shakespearean and
other Elizabethan and Jacobean texts there was a tendency to not be
consistent in speech prefixes and then let them read any of Q, F or a
conflated version of which there are many. I would ask them to pay
particular attention to the matter of disguise.

Complete copies of Leir and Mirror have not been easy to come by in the
past, but now, with the internet, they can easily be read online.

Leir  http://users.bigpond.net.au/catchus/Leir.html
Mirror  http://users.bigpond.net.au/catchus/Mirror.html

A conflated Lear is available at
http://users.bigpond.net.au/catchus/Lear%20text.html

Bob Marks

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