2004

"Beware March 15!" but No Fear Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0736  Monday, 22 March 2004

[1]     From:   Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 19 Mar 2004 12:27:04 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0727 "Beware March 15!" but No Fear Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 19 Mar 2004 23:35:34 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0727 "Beware March 15!" but No Fear Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 19 Mar 2004 12:27:04 -0500
Subject: 15.0727 "Beware March 15!" but No Fear Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0727 "Beware March 15!" but No Fear Shakespeare

For several decades I taught Romeo & Juliet to assorted ability groups
of 10th graders using the Folger Library mass-market paperback because
it has the notes (i.e., definitions and explanations in simple everyday
language) on the left page and the complete text on the right, with lots
of white space on both pages.

I encouraged the students to buy their own copies (even arranging
discounted bulk orders for them) even though the school would provide a
classroom copy; I did so in order to give them the opportunity to notate
the text with questions and explanations.

We read aloud in class almost all the play-- students switched parts so
all got to read; I usually did Nurse in I,iii Mercutio throughout and
Lord C in III,v -- simply b/c I love the scenes and characters and
wanted the students to experience someone who loves the text and the
people in that text.

We discussed how key scenes might be blocked, we worked through scenes
"acting them" -- when possible on the auditorium stage (not often
available however).

I still run into former students who remind me of moments during R&J
they remember keenly.

My personal highlight:  The man who now is a local cop and head football
coach when he was in 10th grade loved reading Shakespeare aloud so much
that, when a female got her hand up first and chose to read Romeo in
II,ii, he got his hand up next and picked Juliet.  Not one titter,
giggle, or snicker... Everyone was so engrossed in the text and the
characters that it just flowed onward.  (Note: this was well before
Lurhmann's film and no, I hadn't shown them the Zefferelli).

This class was composed of the sorts of students many think can't "get"
Shakespeare.  Taurine excrement!  Of course they can, if the teacher
cares, knows Shakespeare and pedagogy, and has the luxury of the *time*
to teach the whole play (I spent 6 weeks on it).

Mari Bonomi

PS: In my last several years of teaching the sophomore Honors group, I
used either the New Cambridge or the Arden 3rd ed. b/c those kids wanted
to be stretched.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 19 Mar 2004 23:35:34 -0000
Subject: 15.0727 "Beware March 15!" but No Fear Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0727 "Beware March 15!" but No Fear Shakespeare

 >This reminds me of the controversy surrounding the introduction of the
 >Good News Bible...
 >e.g. Psalms 5:9
 >
 >For there is no faithfulness in their mouth; Their inward part is very
 >wickedness; Their throat is an open sepulchre; They flatter with their
 >tongue.
 >
 >Becomes
 >
 >What my enemies say can never be trusted;
 >they only want to destroy;
 >Their words are flattering and smooth,
 >but full of deadly deceit.

I agree that the Good News version is dull and flat, but that doesn't
mean a modern version cannot be both accurate and poetic.  Try the same
passage from the New Jerusalem Bible...

Not a word from their lips can be trusted,
through and through they are destruction,
their throats are wide-open graves,
their tongues seductive.

I think that even beats the KJV for poetry!

Peter Bridgman

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

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Academic Freedom And Renaissance Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0735  Friday, 19 March 2004

From:           Robert C. Evans <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 18 Mar 2004 14:00:03 EST
Subject:        Academic Freedom And Renaissance Studies

Dear Colleagues,

This is a bit off-topic, but I am hoping that Hardy will allow it to be
posted.

Many people will have read by now (but many will not) the account in the
most recent _Chronicle of Higher Education_ of the firing of two
professors at the University of Southern Mississppi.  One of these
professors is Gary Stringer, founding editor of the _Donne Variorum_
edition and one of the most distinguished scholars in the field of early
modern literature.  The fact of his firing is astonishing in itself; the
circumstances surrounding it are incredible, particularly in their
implications for academic freedom throughout the US and elsewhere.  The
full text of the _Chronicle_ article, plus much other useful information
for anyone who may want to protest this firing, can be found at the
following website:  www.geocities.com/fireshelby
I am hoping that Shakespeareans will help rally around a very good man
and one of the people who has contributed most to a better understanding
of Shakespeare's era.

With many thanks,
Robert C. (Bob) Evans
Auburn University Montgomery

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Sir Edward Dyer's "jest"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0733  Friday, 19 March 2004

From:           Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 19 Mar 2004 10:43:27 -0000
Subject:        Sir Edward Dyer's "jest"

"quoth Sir Edward Dier, betwene iest, & earnest." -

Following up on Peter Groves' lucid post on the Latin - so, does that
mean the next bit's the other way round? Maybe "Between jest and
earnest" isn't a comment on how Dyer says what he says, it's actually
what he says.  Dyer remarks to Harvey that (since Shakespeare's a mere
playwright turned writer of high-status poetry), the epigraph is
tongue-in-cheek.

An interesting scrap of evidence for Shakespeare's early reception,
whichever way you read it.

All the best,
Matt.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

A Midsummer Night's Dream': Bending Genders in

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0734  Friday, 19 March 2004

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 18 Mar 2004 16:23:01 -0500
Subject:        'A Midsummer Night's Dream': Bending Genders in Midsummer Dreams

Theater Review | 'A Midsummer Night's Dream': Bending Genders in
Midsummer Dreams

March 18, 2004
By MARGO JEFFERSON


Away with lyric fairies and winsome sprites, with love-struck youths and
maids who bleat and moan incessantly. Enough of the playful sweetness
that coats even the meanest acts and goads people who have endured many
an amateur and professional production to swear that if they depart this
life without ever seeing another "Midsummer Night's Dream," they will
depart satisfied.

The audience trod wearily into the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Tuesday
night for the opening of the much-touted Watermill Theater-Propeller
production. (All-male! Puck wears a tutu!) Hours of snow had made us
cynical: right away there were complaints about the smoke drifting up
from a stage bare of everything but tall white ladders with white sheets
draped over them. Another white sheet hung hammock-style from the
ceiling, and another covered the pointed roof of what looked like a
dollhouse center stage.

And then the play - rambunctious, cruel and unpredictably tender -
began. The roof of the dollhouse rose. The sleek blond curls of Puck
(Simon Scardifield), right-hand sprite of Oberon, the Fairy King,
emerged. This Puck was a circus ballet boy in red and white tights, red
ballet slippers and red bow tie. Suspenders held his white tutu up.
Then, with a shake of each hip, he exited, leaving us in Athens, where
Theseus, the duke, was about to wed Hippolyta, the Amazon Queen.

In Shakespeare's time, all women's parts were played by boys and men.
The Propeller Company men are full grown.  Some are small, some have big
broad limbs; some are balding, and there's plenty of chest hair. The
director, Edward Hall, says that these gender anomalies make us listen
closely to the text, watch and assess the love games and power moves of
this triple-tiered kingdom where fairies, aristocrats and peasants cross
paths and fates.  It's true, thanks to the daring, the dazzle and the
pure craft of this company, and it's absolutely exhilarating.

[ . . . ]

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/18/theater/reviews/18DREA.html?ex=1080635265&ei=1&en=6243cb9d836cab51

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Elizabeth told Essex

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0732  Friday, 19 March 2004

From:           David Friedberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 18 Mar 2004 16:16:33 -0500
Subject: 15.0719 Elizabeth told Essex
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0719 Elizabeth told Essex

David Evett writes that the reference is to "the Countess of Nottingham
whom Elizabeth couldn't forgive--for not remembering the ring Essex gave
her, the ring that might have softened Elizabeth, spared beheading"
(I'm quoting John, not Capps, who may also supply a C19 reference for
the material). John notes that putting a full stop at the end of line
two clarifies the syntax.

Wasn't it in 1066 and All That, the greatest history text of all time,
that Essex tried to give Elizabath a ring but the Palace operator
wouldnt put him through?.

God may forgive you, said the Queen to the telephone operator, but I
never will

Sellers and Yateman I think

David Friedberg

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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