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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: April ::
Summer Session Syllabus
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0872  Wednesday, 14 April 2004

[1]     From:   R. A. Cantrell <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 08:06:57 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

[2]     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 09:21:31 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

[3]     From:   Ted Nellen <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 09:32:03 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

[4]     From:   Todd Pettigrew <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 13:15:39 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

[5]     From:   Kelly Rivers <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 13:02:57 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

[6]     From:   Chris Gordon <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 13:02:35 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. A. Cantrell <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 08:06:57 -0500
Subject: 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

 >Love's Labors Lost, 1H4, Lear, Measure for
 >Measure and The Tempest.  Any suggestions / alternatives?

LLL is, in my opinion, too obscure in its allusions for a
beginner/survey course.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 09:21:31 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

"I'd like to teach a comedy, history, tragedy, dark comedy / tragicomedy
/ problem play and a romance..."

You can cover almost all of that with Troilus and Cressida. It is a
difficult play, but I find it very rewarding to teach. Students have
never encountered it or anything like it. You can use the prologue to
talk about questions of genre and there are a variety of languages. I
agree that Measure for Measure works very well, but you might think of
pairing it with A Winter's Tale for discussions of sexuality and fear
surrounding sexuality.

Annalisa Castaldo

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ted Nellen <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 09:32:03 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

I like your choices very much especially for this audience.  I'd suggest
Troilus and Cressida instead of MfM, esp in these times.  it was the one
that rocked my boat when I was serving in Nam and it introduced me to
Shakespeare.

tednellen

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Todd Pettigrew <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 13:15:39 -0300
Subject: 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

This is obviously a highly subjective and personal thing but here are my
thoughts:

Comedy: I like Taming of the Shrew as an introduction to comedy, and
judging from the number of students who choose to write about it, many
students find it engaging too.

Tragedy: I feel that Othello is Shakespeare's best play (well, I did say
this was subjective, didn't I?) and is the one play I would not leave
out of any introduction to Shakespeare course.

History:  Richard III is my standard intro to the history play, but I
taught King John for the first time this past year and had a ball with it.

Dark Comedy: Measure for Measure?  The sexual politics of this play can
be very engaging for undergrads.  Merchant of Venice might also do what
you need to do here as well.

Romance:  I like to teach The Tempest but, perhaps surprisingly, I find
students respond well to Pericles too.

t.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kelly Rivers <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 13:02:57 -0400
Subject: 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

Joe-

I've had great success teaching _Taming of the Shrew_.  The students
really liked the style and flow of the story-they thought the tragedies
were too heady and plotting, but they appreciated the quick quips and
zingers in Taming.

Just a suggestion.

Kelly Rivers
Univ. of TN, Knoxville

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Gordon <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 2004 13:02:35 CDT
Subject: 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0859 Summer Session Syllabus

Joe Canzeroni is thinking about teaching:

 >Love\'s Labors Lost, 1H4, Lear, Measure for
 >Measure and The Tempest.  Any suggestions / alternatives?

in his summer course for non-majors. My only suggestion would be to
substitute a different comedy, since Love\'s Labors tends to be very
language-intensive and difficult. Much Ado, perhaps? Or As You Like It?
  Midsummer is taught a lot, but also produced a lot, so it might be of
interest as well. (Or you could opt for one of the other early comedies:
Comedy of Errors or Two Gentlemen of Verona.)

Chris Gordon

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