2004

Shakespeare Apocrypha

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0970  Wednesday, 28 April 2004

From:           Stanley Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 16:22:04 +0100
Subject: 15.0962 Shakespeare Apocrypha
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0962 Shakespeare Apocrypha

John Jowett's recently published Oxford Shakespeare/World's Classics
edition of Timon of Athens represents the strongest case yet made for
the collaboration, and edits the play with full acceptance of the case.

Stanley Wells

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The Murder of Gonzago

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0969  Wednesday, 28 April 2004

[1]     From:   Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 10:22:21 -0400
        Subj:   The Murder of Gonzago

[2]     From:   David Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 09:37:06 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0956 The Murder of Gonzago


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 10:22:21 -0400
Subject:        The Murder of Gonzago

Tony Burton writes:

"In the case of "Hamlet," the ghost is presumably "real," i.e., it can
be seen by others than Hamlet himself, but the exact meaning if its
instructions and the safety and rightness of following them, both remain
doubtful."

Exactly right.

Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 09:37:06 -0500
Subject: 15.0956 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0956 The Murder of Gonzago

In response to Sean Lawrence, you wrote, ". . . I think ascertaining
God's Will is the central intellectual problem in the play - both for
the audience and for Hamlet. And that's what I think the play from 4.4
on is primarily about." What specific part of the text do you have in
mind as evidence for this intriguing statement?

David Cohen

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1976 Ashland "The Curate Shakespeare As You Like It"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0967  Wednesday, 28 April 2004

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 13:30:46 -0700
Subject:        1976 Ashland "The Curate Shakespeare As You Like It"

Cut-and-paste 'Curate Shakespeare' is an oddity
By Joe Adcock
Seattle Post-Intelligencer Theater Critic
April 27, 2004

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/theater/170686_curateq.html

THEATER REVIEW

The Curate Shakespeare As You Like It
PLAYWRIGHT: Don Nigro revision of the comedy by William Shakespeare
WHERE: Tacoma Actors Guild, 915 Broadway, Tacoma
WHEN: Through May 9

This production is like an art project in which a picture is cut up, and
then the pieces are pasted onto another picture. The cut-up picture in
this case is William Shakespeare's most popular comedy, the aptly named
"As You Like It." The picture onto which the pieces are pasted depicts
psychodrama group therapy for 1970s hippies. Their psychedelic VW van
pulls into a parking lot. And they proceed to stage "As You Like It."

More or less.

Shakespeare's scenes are squeezed or omitted. Several of his characters
are excised. Six actors play four or five roles each.  A seventh actor,
severely burned out by too many bad drug trips or something, comments,
sings, mimes and, on occasion, runs amok.  [See addendum from another
review.]

The other actors don't exactly run amok. But they do act out their
personal and interpersonal problems from time to time. The addled
therapist/participant is referred to as "Curate" ("caretaker" in
English, "heal thyself" in Spanish).

"The Curate Shakespeare," the current Tacoma Actors Guild production, is
odd. At times it is refreshing. At times it is annoyingly cute. Despite
his title character's exasperated generalizations about life, playwright
Don Nigro's cut and paste and doodle treatment makes no particularly
memorable point.

Unless, of course, the point is to present a name brand audience pleaser
without having to hire two-dozen actors. Oddly enough, "The Curate
Shakespeare" was commissioned by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, which
has something like 50 actors on its payroll at any given moment. In any
event, since it premiered in 1976, the play has been a perennial
favorite with schools, community theaters and regional companies.

TAG director Pat Patton (an Oregon Festival alumnus) offers a balance of
silliness and sincerity. Betsy Schwartz is tedious as the Curate group's
resident whiner. But she is very effective when she (or, rather, her
character) finally gets down to work.  Kate Wisniewski is similarly
effective in her Shakespeare roles and similarly tedious as a bundle of
stage fright.

In fact, all of Patton's actors are impressive as Shakespeare characters
and not so impressive as Nigro characters. Danforth Comins plays
Shakespeare's romantic hero, Joshua Bott is a farcical rustic and Andrew
DeRycke is the resident jester. John Patrick Lowrie, as Curate, plays a
whole bunch of elderly men and Mari Nelson is the burn-out case.

A setting by Carey Wong goes way beyond the limits of a VW van and
whimsical group therapy. Particularly impressive are four pillars that,
on cue, sprout fronds to represent palm trees.

--
[The Tacoma paper's review
(http://www.tribnet.com/entertainment/story/5010607p-4938665c.ht ml) by
Alec Clayton is somewhat longer and explains how the small-cast version
works:  "...this troupe intensifies the confusion to hilarious ends as
they present a play-within-a-play with six actors playing themselves and
20-something other characters. A seventh actor, Rosalind (Mari Nelson),
refuses to play herself and thinks there are even more characters in the
play. Serving as a chorus of one with the job of explaining the play to
the audience, she proclaims at one point that the next scene is going to
be a 'wedding orgy and pep rally' with 'all 37' characters on stage at
once."]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Figures of Speech

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0968  Wednesday, 28 April 2004

[1]     From:   Jeremy Fiebig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 10:11:59 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

[2]     From:   Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 11:33:47 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

[3]     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 18:16:44 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

[4]     From:   F Helphinstine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 15:28:35 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

[5]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 15:49:05 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeremy Fiebig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 10:11:59 -0400
Subject: 15.0954 Figures of Speech
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/silva.htm

The most complete site I've found is "The Forest of Rhetoric" which
includes very, very many rhetorical figures and as well as Puttenham's
Art of English Poesie.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 11:33:47 -0300
Subject: 15.0954 Figures of Speech
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

Andy Jones will certainly find the web site Sylva Rhetoricae very
valuable in preparing his talk.  The address is:

http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/

It lists hundreds of rhetorical figures from abating to zeugma. It also
gives more general commentary on rhetoric and its history.

There is also a very functional glossary of terms at (oddly enough)
Bob's Byway:

http://www.poeticbyway.com/glossary.html

t.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 18:16:44 +0100
Subject: 15.0954 Figures of Speech
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

For rhetorical figures the best website by miles is Silva Rhetoricae at
  http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/silva.htm

Be prepared for a surprise - there are hundreds of figures of speech in
classical and Renaissance rhetoric.

There are plenty of introductory books about or containing discussions
of Renaissance rhetoric - try Brian Vickers, Classical Rhetoric in
English Poetry, which contains a short list of some of the most
important figures, as does Gert Ronberg's A Way with Words.

On verse forms I would recommend John Hollander's witty book Rhyme's
Reason, the 'enlarged' edition of 1989 - he not only tells you what the
verse forms are, he demonstrates them.

David Lindley
University of Leeds

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           F Helphinstine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 15:28:35 -0400
Subject: 15.0954 Figures of Speech
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

Here is a site with several rhetorical terms:
http://www.uky.edu/ArtsSciences/Classics/rhetoric.html

Joseph Malof's A Manual of English Meters is a technical manual of
metrical forms and techniques of scansion with clear explanations
combined with aptly chosen examples.

Fran Helphinstine

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 15:49:05 -0400
Subject: 15.0954 Figures of Speech
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0954 Figures of Speech

I have a little book called "Figures of Speech, 60 Ways to Turn a
Phrase" by Arthur Quinn (Gibbs M. Smith, Inc., 1982), which gives
examples of numerous rhetorical figures, from abusio (another term for
catachresis) to zeugma.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Interpretation of History Plays...

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0966  Wednesday, 28 April 2004

From:           This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 2004 10:07:52 EDT
Subject:        Interpretation of History Plays...

E. M. W. Tillyard in 1944 wrote an interpretation of the history plays
that stresses the Tudor myth, the great chain of being and the
Elizabethan world view.  Can someone explain why this is today so
discredited?  How could a mode of interpretation change so quickly?

Michael B. Luskin

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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