2004

Shakespeare in the Vineyard

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0910  Wednesday, 21 April 2004

From:           John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 21 Apr 2004 01:17:27 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare in the Vineyard

Henry of Pelham Winery and Garden City Productions present Merchant of
Venice.

6 outdoor performances July 15 - 25

Cost $25-

Order tickets: Arts Box Office Brock University

905-688-5550

Online: www.arts.brocku.ca

The winery is in the Niagara Region. A visit to this production could be
part of a trip to Niagara Falls or The Shaw Festival.

John Ramsay

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

New Special Issue of EMLS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0909  Wednesday, 21 April 2004

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Apr 2004 09:54:04 -0700
Subject:        New Special Issue of EMLS

The latest special issue of Early Modern Literary Studies has just been
posted at http://purl.oclc.org/emls/emlsframes.html

Editted by Gabriel Egan, this issue is dedicated to "Computer Modelling
of Performance Spaces".  Illustrations for certain of the articles
require a virtual reality modelling language plug-in for a web-browser.

Yours sincerely,
Sean Lawrence,
Assistant Editor.


Contents of EMLS Special Issue 13 (April 2004):

Editor's introduction. Gabriel Egan, Shakespeare's Globe and King's
College London.

A report on Virtual Reality (VR) in theatre history research: Creating a
spatial context for performance. [2] Christie Carson, Royal Holloway
University of London.

Modelling the anatomy theatre and the indoor hall theatre: Dissection on
the stages of early modern London. [3] Christian Billing, University of
Hull.

Reconstructing Shakespeare's second Globe using 'Computer Aided Design'
(CAD) tools. [4] Tim Fitzpatrick, University of Sydney.

The 1599 Globe and its modern replica: Virtual Reality modelling of the
archaeological and pictorial evidence. [5] Gabriel Egan, Shakespeare's
Globe and King's College London.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Murder of Gonzago

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0907  Tuesday, 20 April 2004

[1]     From:   Douglas Brooks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 2004 07:43:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0890 The Murder of Gonzago

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 2004 09:28:20 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0890 The Murder of Gonzago

[3]     From:   Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 2004 20:14:11 -0400
        Subj:   The Murder of Gonzago


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Brooks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 2004 07:43:59 -0500
Subject: 15.0890 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0890 The Murder of Gonzago

Richard Brome's The Antipodes (1640) makes fascinating use of a play
within a play.

As for the other question regarding earlier revenge tragedies, several
English translations of Seneca's revenge tragedies appeared in print
between 1558 and 1587.  They are the models for many of the revenge
tragedies to follow, including Hamlet. Indeed, Freud got it very wrong
with regard to the links between Hamlet and Oedipus, because he assumed
it was Sophocles' play that lies behind the Shakespearean text. Rather
it was Seneca's Oedipus, a very different play.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 2004 09:28:20 -0700
Subject: 15.0890 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0890 The Murder of Gonzago

Ed Taft writes,

 >Just about everybody (except Don) accepts that, among other things, the
 >play *Hamlet* is an intellectual tour-de-force. Such plays are designed
 >to examine the very questions that Don wants us not to look at.

On the contrary, by avoiding speculations in historical metaphysics, we
give ourselves greater scope to examine the intellectual and exigent
questions surrounding suicide, being and nothingness, ethics and the Other.

Yours,
Sean.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 2004 20:14:11 -0400
Subject:        The Murder of Gonzago

Thomas Larque writes: "I'm not sure whether anybody has pointed out that
- theology aside - Shakespeare *needs* purgatory for the literary
situation in "Hamlet". This is an interesting observation, but I
disagree on two counts.

First, Old Hamlet need not resemble at all the place where he comes
from. He would not have to be besoiled and covered with grime and blood
if he came from hell. That's because, as both Milton and Hamlet himself
point out, "the devil [and those who do his bidding] can assume a
pleasing shape." Nor would his discourse have to be unbearably vile. Ask
Eve - Satan can be quite pleasing to the ear.

Second, the Ghost does not have to say a word about the afterlife - what
it's like, whether he suffers torments or not, etc. He need only tell
young Hamlet the manner of his father's death and how and why it
constitutes murder that needs to be revenged.

So the Ghost tells us things that Shakespeare wants told, not things
that somehow Shakespeare has to tell us -- things that complicate the
issue in important and meaningful ways. What does seem clear is that
Shakespeare wants these complications -- not that, for some reason, he
has to have them. Thomas seems to assume as fact that the Ghost comes
from purgatory. But it's not a fact. That's the subject at issue - and a
very important issue it is, too.

Ed Taft

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare Across Ages and Stages, May 1 2004

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0908  Wednesday, 21 April 2004

From:           Susan Brock <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Apr 2004 17:20:56 +0100
Subject:        Shakespeare Across Ages and Stages, May 1 2004

SHAKSPERians might be interested in this event for teachers of Shakespeare:

Shakespeare Across Ages and Stages, May 1 2004

The British Shakespeare Association and the English Subject Centre are
co-hosting an event for teachers of Shakespeare across the educational
spectrum at the Bloomsbury Theatre, London, on May 1, 2004. This event
will combine panel discussions with a workshop, demonstrations and two
performances. The aim is to stimulate a lively debate and to raise
issues of concern for teachers of Shakespeare from a variety of
environments.

In the morning the focus will be on particular plays, beginning with a
panel discussion about the challenges faced by those addressing Hamlet
including Professor Ann Thompson, Editor of the Arden Hamlet, Stephen
Unwin, Artistic Director of the English Touring Theatre and Giles Block,
Director of Hamlet at the Globe Theatre in 2000 starring Mark Rylance.
This will be followed by a workshop on Henry VII led by Dr Gordon
McMullan, King's College London.

In the afternoon more general teaching issues will be discussed by a
panel that spans colleges, universities and schools. Finally,
representatives from the British Library, the Royal Shakespeare Company,
Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the Globe Theatre will demonstrate the
resources that they provide for teachers.

After a break for drinks a group from the Alderbrook School, Solihull
will perform an abridged version of Hamlet and the Marlowe Dramatic
Society, Cambridge will perform a series of staged readings. (Further
information is available at
http://www.english.ltsn.ac.uk/events/shakespeare and tickets can be
booked at http://www.thebloomsbury.com/ .)

The English Subject Centre, as part of the national Learning and
Teaching Support Network (LTSN), has a remit to support innovation in
teaching across higher education.  This event has been put together to
support that remit. If you would like further information about this
event please contact Dr Christie Carson, project officer for C&IT,
English Subject Centre, Royal Holloway University of London, at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Susan Brock
The Shakespeare Centre Library
Stratford-upon-Avon

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Fortinbras: bad boy, bad boy?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0906  Tuesday, 20 April 2004

[1]     From:   Alberto Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 2004 08:35:59 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0893 Fortinbras: bad boy, bad boy?

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 2004 13:07:29 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0893 Fortinbras: bad boy, bad boy?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alberto Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 2004 08:35:59 -0400
Subject: 15.0893 Fortinbras: bad boy, bad boy?
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0893 Fortinbras: bad boy, bad boy?

I can't say I've ever thought of Fortinbras as the conqueror of Denmark
at the end of the play.  It doesn't seem likely at first thought,
however.  At the same time, I don't think that Horatio is so
straightforwardly uncompromised and innocent.  What's he doing in
Elsinore in the first place, hanging out with the soldiers in the
taverns?  Why does it take him so long to approach Hamlet?  Does he see
the appearance of the ghost as an opportunity to reintroduce himself to
Hamlet, and so go from tavern to court?  Has he taken advantage of that
opportunity so that by 4.5 he's giving advice to Gertrude about
receiving Ophelia in her madness?  What is Horatio doing in the rest of
4.5, in fact?  What does he mean by "Why, what a king is this!" in 5.2.62?

In doubts,
Al Cacicedo
Albright College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 2004 13:07:29 -0400
Subject: 15.0893 Fortinbras: bad boy, bad boy?
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0893 Fortinbras: bad boy, bad boy?

I recently saw a Columbia School of the Arts production in which the
soldiers attending Fortinbras shoot Osric upon entering the final scene.
  They then hold a gun to the head of a visibly terrified Horatio who is
VERY relieved when they don't kill him.

But the line isn't "Bid the soldiers shoot." It's "Go bid the soldiers
shoot" which is an instruction requiring movement which would not be
necessary for soldiers in the room. Also, Fortinbras is obviously
planning a meeting with the aethlings to gain their official support
using Horatio's eyewitness explanation of the royal family's
self-extinction: "Let us haste to hear it,/And call the noblest to the
audience."

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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