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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: May ::
The Murder of Gonzago
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0997  Monday, 3 May 2004

[1]     From:   David Cohen <
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        Date:   Friday, 30 Apr 2004 10:32:14 -0500
        Subj:   Fwd: SHK 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago

[2]     From:   David Cohen <
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        Date:   Friday, 30 Apr 2004 10:34:01 -0500
        Subj:   Fwd: SHK 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago

[3]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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        Date:   Friday, 30 Apr 2004 09:00:50 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Cohen <
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Date:           Friday, 30 Apr 2004 10:32:14 -0500
Subject: 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        Fwd: SHK 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago

David, I am curious where in the text you find evidence for the idea
that, "Hamlet has confused himself with God."

David Cohen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Cohen <
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Date:           Friday, 30 Apr 2004 10:34:01 -0500
Subject: 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        Fwd: SHK 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago

I believe that all the points Don Bloom offers in response to Ed Taft's
six points are reasonable but how do they-or Ed's six, for that
matter-go to Ed's provocative basic point, namely that, "ascertaining
God's Will is the central intellectual problem in the play . . . what I
think the play from 4.4 on is primarily about.'

David

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Friday, 30 Apr 2004 09:00:50 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0989 The Murder of Gonzago

David Cohen writes, "I'll suggest that whatever, as you say, 'is going
on here,' it must involve the idea of free will vs.  determinism.  In
the following, Shakespeare (through Hamlet) seems ambivalent, suggesting
both free will and determinism in just two lines...In sum, I have
trouble with the idea that 'ascertaining God's Will is the central
intellectual problem in the play' from 4.4.  But if it is, it just as
likely suggests (with a lot of other text) that there is no 'God's will.'"

In previous posts, which can be searched in Hardy's SHAKSPER, I have
made reference to my detailed study of Will S. and the KJV in my book
*JESUS: The Gospel According To Will*, so I will not duplicate my
remarks.  I praise David Cohen for his lucid post, but I would like to
take issue with his seemingly nihilistic conclusion.

My point is: Will S. was, in my scholarly opinion, a "Christian" in his
theology as it appears in his writings; and the essence of the words of
Jesus on this "Will" point comes from the multiple "Will" referents by
Jesus throughout the New Testament.

Will S. knew full well these *Will* words in their totality in the KJV
as referenced by his myriad thousands of literary allusions to the text.
  They culminate in the KJV, Matthew, C 6, Vs. 9-13, also known as the
Lord's Prayer, especially, V. 9-10, "Pray ye: Our Father...Thy kingdom
come.  Thy will be done on earth, as *it is* in heaven."

I have refrained from *italizing* all the *Will* words, but I would
remind all that Will S., as noted and detailed in my book, made
extensive usage of puns on his *Will* name, especially in his sonnets,
and might well have been doing the same in the play *Hamlet*.  Will S.
was fully cognizant of the multiple meanings of *Will* in all senses,
including Christian theology!

In summation: Hamlet the character seems to be doing the Lord's Prayer,
as it invokes: accomplishing th[y] *Father's Will* so that *Thy will be
done on earth, as **it is** in heaven."

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

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