Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: May ::
The Murder of Gonzago
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1020  Thursday, 6 May 2004

[1]     From:   Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 May 2004 06:04:38 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1008 The Murder of Gonzago

[2]     From:   Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 May 2004 06:20:45 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1008 The Murder of Gonzago

[3]     From:   Nick Clary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 May 2004 10:42:18 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1014 The Murder of Gonzago

[4]     From:   Jack Heller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 6 May 2004 07:40:28 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1014 The Murder of Gonzago


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 5 May 2004 06:04:38 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 15.1008 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1008 The Murder of Gonzago

D Bloom writes, "But I am puzzled by the reference to the KJV, which
could hardly have had any impact on the bulk of S's writing. Are we
talking here about the earlier English translations, the ones
Shakespeare would have grown up with and heard read in church up through
1611?"

OK: of course in Hardy's SHAKSPER archives I have made all this clear,
as well as in my book *JESUS: The Gospel According To Will*.  Yes, of
course it was to earlier versions of the *Bible* which Will S. had made
his thousands of literary allusions, and Shakespeare scholars knew
whereof I spoke.  Read my book!  Must I again cite Shaheen's *Biblical
References in Shakespeare's Plays* and Noble's *Shakespeare's Biblical
Knowledge*?  As always, and I have said this repeatedly, I refer to the
KJV because of the supposed involvement in its translation by Will S.,
and its relevance to the Shakespearean Age.  C'mon, all, use Hardy's
archives on SHAKSPER!  Prove yourself worthy of the moniker: scholars.

OK: not to miss the point: Will S. was well-read in the Bible; Will S.
punned on his moniker *Will* in his sonnets, and more than likely in
*Hamlet*; the concept of *Will* is the abiding force in the spiritual
message of Jesus, of the New Testament, translating into Will, Spirit,
Ghost, Breath, Soul, as noted in texts on *Christology*; the same may be
said of Will S.; thus, the spirit of the father of Hamlet could be said
to be bringing the good news from heaven [invoked by Hamlet in Act I],
and that is that it is the *Will of God* to have *on/in earth* that
which He has in *heaven*, and that is *His Will DONE*!  Finally, the
will of God would thereby be *DONE* if Hamlet throws out the bad guy,
Claudius, and makes on/in earth as it is in heaven: under the rule of
law and not the rule of an evil king, things ruled by a Good God who has
given us *GOOD* laws!  It must be remembered, that in the Bibles of the
time, including the KJV, the world of God was referred to as the
*Kingdom of God*!

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 5 May 2004 06:20:45 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 15.1008 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1008 The Murder of Gonzago

David Cohen writes, But in his beliefs?  Why put quotes around Christian
unless you mean that he only appeared to be a Christian in his many
allusions to Christianity-that he should spout theology with the best of
them, not to mention punning circles around them.  If so, you quotation
marks seem to fit my hypothesis that, regardless of his prodigious
knowledge, and regardless of church figures or Christian allusions in
his plays, S did not embrace Christianity as a true believer."

OK: David, the reason I put "Christian" in quotes is because of
precisely the fact that there is a big difference between Christianity
as a religion and Christianity as a body of thoughts as espoused by
Jesus.  In the latter sense, I am a follower of Jesus, but I do not
espouse any particular religious sect.  Is that clear?  I made all this
clear in my book *JESUS: The Gospel According To Will* which can be
obtained on Abebooks.com and my arguments are in Hardy's SHAKSPER
archives.  Organized religions have distorted the message of Jesus, the
body of thought he spoke.  I clarified this in my book.

OK: it is not up to me to decide if Will S. was *in his heart* a
follower of Jesus or merely making literary allusions to Biblical texts,
or carrying on some political argument with religious factions.  I am
sure Will S. was aware of the *Equivocation Doctrine*!  I make the point
about *Hamlet* as stated, and it *IS* relevant to bring in Will S.'s
puns on his *Will* moniker in his sonnets, inasmuch as he might mean
similar puns in his play *Hamlet*.  You decide.

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 5 May 2004 10:42:18 -0400
Subject: 15.1014 The Murder of Gonzago
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1014 The Murder of Gonzago

The Murder of Gonzago

Speaking of mirrors and Hamlet editions, it is somewhat curious that
there are two references to mirrors and two references to glasses in Q2
(1604), though there are no references to mirrors or glasses in Q1 (1603).

A little book was printed by John Legat (printer to the University of
Cambridge) and sold in Pauls Churchyard at the sign of the Crowne by
Simon Waterson in 1603: A princes looking glasse, or A princes
direction, very requisite and necessarie for a Christian prince, to view
and behold himselfe in, containing sundrie, wise, learned, godly, and
princely precepts and instructions, excerpted and chosen out of that
most Christian, and vertuous Basilikon d

 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.