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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: December ::
Real Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.2042  Thursday, 2 December 2004

[1]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Dec 2004 06:29:10 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.2037 Real Hamlet

[2]     From:   David Crosby <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Dec 2004 09:30:07 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.2037 Real Hamlet

[3]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Dec 2004 18:59:39 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.2037 Real Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Dec 2004 06:29:10 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 15.2037 Real Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.2037 Real Hamlet

Colin Cox writes, "I would be mightily surprised if there are two
readers of the text of Hamlet that after a first read, without any
prodding from profs such as Bill, could ever agree upon a 'real' Hamlet."
What a mighty firestorm of wasps we got buzzing around this thread, Colin.

Interesting: because the stereotypical Prince Hamlet the procrastinator
is, indeed, dead.  The collective unconscious prince carried round in
most people's minds these days is the dude who took on the evil usurper
king Claudius who slept with his conniving mom, and the shrinks are
having a Freudian field day.  But, we're making them all wake up to the
real Hamlet!

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Crosby <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Dec 2004 09:30:07 -0600
Subject: 15.2037 Real Hamlet
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.2037 Real Hamlet

I cannot fathom why so many otherwise reasonable writers continue to
respond to the self-contradictory and deliberately provocative,
self-serving posts of Bill Arnold.

The megabytes of memory that have been lavished on trying to answer his
unanswerables (what is the real Hamlet?) might be much better spent
discussing legitimate points of interpretation or contributing to the
dissemination of solid factual information about texts and performances
of Shakespeare's plays and those of his contemporaries and collaborators.

I offer this not as a criticism of Bill Arnold (though I obviously find
him annoying). He is what he is, and I usually have the sense to use the
delete button on the threads he initiates. But why do so many rise to
his bait that my delete finger gets worn down to the nubbin?

Regards,
Dave

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Dec 2004 18:59:39 -0000
Subject: 15.2037 Real Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.2037 Real Hamlet

Scott Sharplin <
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 >

 >Mr. Arnold's anecdote about the writer of "Flowers for Algernon" only
 >demonstrates how far from reality his interpretation of Shakespeare's
 >works must be. Dan Keyes was upset when his short story was adapted to
 >FILM, ie. into a totally new medium with which the source text was
 >scarcely compatible.

Slightly off-topic, but just to get this straight:  Keyes wrote *two*
versions of "Flowers for Algeron", as a short-story (1959), later
expanded to a  novel.

<The story [which] came to the small screen in a 1966 televised play, "The
Two Worlds of Charlie Gordon," was expanded into a full-length novel in
1966, and inspired the1968 film, "Charly" ... >

         http://www.bookrags.com/notes/alg/BIO.htm

Confession:  I've only read the short-story (in the sixties) -- I
couldn't bear to imagine what would happen when it was expanded, the
original version being so good, so never read the novel version-and have
seen neither of the visual adaptations.

Robin Hamilton

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