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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: December ::
Greenblatt's Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.2095  Monday, 13 December 2004

[1]     From:   Cheryl Newton <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 Dec 2004 08:55:30 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.2083 Greenblatt's Hamlet

[2]     From:   Rolland Banker <
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        Date:   Sunday, 12 Dec 2004 18:51:54 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.2075 Greenblatt's Hamlet/ and That Opening G chord


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cheryl Newton <
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Date:           Friday, 10 Dec 2004 08:55:30 -0500
Subject: 15.2083 Greenblatt's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.2083 Greenblatt's Hamlet

 >>WHAT IS HORATIO BEING CALLED ON TO TELL THE WORLD.
 >
 >That Old Hamlet's soul resides in purgatory.
 >
 >Peter Bridgman

?? Hamlet worries that he leaves a wounded name, & wants Horatio to
report him "a right" to the public.  It's young Hamlet who depends on
his friend to explain the tragedy to the yet unknowing world.

Cheryl Newton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rolland Banker <
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 >
Date:           Sunday, 12 Dec 2004 18:51:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 15.2075 Greenblatt's Hamlet/ and That Opening G chord
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.2075 Greenblatt's Hamlet/ and That Opening G chord

 >>WHAT IS HORATIO BEING CALLED ON TO TELL THE WORLD.
 >>That Old Hamlet's soul resides in purgatory.

The opening G chord of George Harrison's on Hard Day's Night is
continually being analysed for it's perfectly resonating introduction to
the Shakespeareanesque-titled(another Ringoism) Beatle Hit. The
musicologists think they may now have it.

 >>WHAT IS HORATIO BEING CALLED ON TO TELL THE WORLD.

Ala Harold Bloom not wanting to deflate Hamlet to any consistency,
nevertheless I too like to recognise the "two mysteries of Hamlet": the
theatrical that we love and analyse and, the visionary, or what I would
call the IGGI or, intuitive-gut-genius-intelligence factor that
continually breeds autodidatic visionary sinners like me.

I am not one of the "Gospel of John as pretext and subtext of HAMLET"
folk, but the final verse of the Gospel of John (KJV and no doubt the
Geneva version or whatever was in use at WS' time) is:

"And there are also many other things which Jesus did,
the which, if they should be written every one, I
suppose that even the world itself could not contain
the books that should be written. Amen."
John 21:25

It has a certain transcendent resonation. Compare Hamlet's:

You that look pale and tremble at this chance,
That are but mutes or audience to this act,
Had I but time--as this fell sergeant, Death,
Is strict in his arrest--O, I could tell you--
But let it be.
V.ii.339-43

Amen!

There is that resounding transcendent G chord again--or is it?

Wikipedia quotes one expert that:

the opening chord is a major subtonic ninth (&#9837;VII, read "flat
seven", plus the seventh and ninth, in G major: F A C E G) - the major
subtonic being a borrowed chord commonly used by the Beatles,

Another expert:

interprets the chord as a surrogate dominant (surrogate V, the dominant
preparing or leading to the tonic chord), in G major the dominant being
D, with the G being a anticipation that resolves in the G major chord
that opens the verse. He also suggests it is a mixture of d minor, F
major, and G major (missing the B).

Und another expert:

calls it a Dm7sus4 (D F G A C), which is the dominant seventh (plus the
fourth, G).

Of course, Wikipedia says there is room for multiple authorship:

in analyzing the opening chord by "de-composing the sound into original
frequencies, using a combination of computer software and old-fashioned
chalkboard." According to Brown, the Rickenbacker guitar wasn't the only
instrument used. "It wasn't just George Harrison playing it and it
wasn't just the Beatles playing on it... There was a piano in the mix."
To be exact, he claims that Harrison was playing the following notes on
his 12 string guitar: a2, a3, d3, d4, g3, g4, c4, and another c4;
McCartney played a d3 on his bass; producer George Martin was playing
d3, f3, d5, g5, and e6 on the piano, while Lennon played a loud c5 on
his six-string guitar.

A piano? Hmm. Who'd a thunk it?

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