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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: December ::
Taming of the Shrew Query
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.2129  Monday, 20 December 2004

[1]     From:   Jim Carroll <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Dec 2004 11:28:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.2118 Taming of the Shrew Query

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Dec 2004 11:30:57 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.2118 Taming of the Shrew Query


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Carroll <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Dec 2004 11:28:40 -0500
Subject: 15.2118 Taming of the Shrew Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.2118 Taming of the Shrew Query

 >>Thou liest, thou thread, thou thimble,
 >>Thou yard, three-quarters, half-yard, quarter, nail!
 >>Thou flea, thou nit, thou winter cricket thou!
 >>Braved in mine own house with a skein of thread! (4.3.106-10)

Didn't insects infest clothing in those days? It seems to me that
Petruchio is comparing the tailor to those things that, through the
agency of cloth or thread, are enabled to enter his home and speak
"brave" words, and the insects in particular are derogatory as well.

Jim Carroll

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Dec 2004 11:30:57 -0500
Subject: 15.2118 Taming of the Shrew Query
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.2118 Taming of the Shrew Query

Fleas, nits, and crickets all infest clothing. Winter crickets are
adults looking for warmth and will leave the field and invade the home.

http://www.ivyhall.district96.k12.il.us/4th/kkhp/1insects/cricket.html

The Field Crickets

They are the most common cricket found in pastures and meadows. The
field crickets are, at times, very damaging to field crops, especially
alfalfa, wheat, oats or rye. In the Gulf states they may damage
tomatoes, peas, beans or strawberries. They also consume dead or
weakened crickets, grasshoppers, cutworms and other insects. When these
crickets invade the home, they may attack textiles of cotton, linen,
wool and silk, as well as furs. Clothing, if stained with perspiration,
greasy foods, milk or syrup is liable to injury.

http://www.bugspray.com/articles98/fieldcrickets.html

Crickets feed on just about anything. This includes dead insects, live
insects, silk, wool, man-made fabric, paper, wood, and just about
anything we eat...In fact, crickets are just as likely to be a pest in
closets as moths or carpet beetles.

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