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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: November ::
Patagonese Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.2011  Thursday, 25 November 2004

From:           D Bloom <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 2004 08:13:24 -0600
Subject:        Patagonese Shakespeare

In point of fact the cultural underpinnings of the alleged
"Shakespearean" plays were discovered a few years by myself and revealed
in my article "The Cultural Underpinnings of the Alleged 'Shakespearean'
Plays," published in *Cultural Underpinnings* two years ago.

In it I show that the plays were in fact based on myths and legends of
the Chaako-Suubeer people of Lower Patagonia, one of whom was taken on
board the Golden Hind during Drake's circumnavigation of the globe
(whence the name of the theatre). Learning English rapidly, the man
(known only by the name of his people) regaled the crew with his
people's tales. These proved to be so popular that on the return of the
ship to London he was sold as a slave to Lord Feversham (later the Earl
of Stratford), a noted collector. Feversham, or more likely another of
his slaves, wrote down the stories, unfortunately using an obscure coded
shorthand. Reports of the stories evidently circulated throughout
aristocratic circles of Elizabethan England and their slaves, but the
originals were thought to have been lost.

Then, a few years ago, I met a descendent of Feversham on a bench in
MacArthur Park in Los Angeles. Being rather hard up, and having a
strange and unreadable document in his possession, he accepted two
bottles of Thunderbird for it.

I have thus far been able to decode only fragments of the text, but I
have made most progress on the one that relates contest of two clans,
the Roo-Myoo (Eats Many Penguins) and the Chool-Yoot (Seal Blubber), for
overlordship of Booroon-Ga (southern Patagonia). After many bloody
battles, the priest of the one and the sacred virgin of the other were
sacrificed to Az-Khah-Lahs (Anteater Lord), the tutelary god of the
Chaako-Suubeer, and peace was restored

I will have further reports as I uncover the secrets of this remarkable
(and, indeed, earth-shaking) manuscript.

don

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