2004

Ruhl's Eurydice

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1971  Thursday, 18 November 2004

From:           Bill Bogert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 2004 08:09:10 -0800
Subject:        Inquiry about Ruhl's Eurydice

I'm interested in exploring Shakespearean resonances in Sarah Ruhl's
2003 play, Eurydice. Would anyone on the list know how I can obtain a
copy of the text?  Or know any details about forthcoming publication of
the play?

Bill Bogert

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Henry V

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1970  Wednesday, 17 November 2004

[1]     From:   Harvey Roy Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 12:30:29 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1958 Henry V

[2]     From:   Harvey Roy Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 12:32:34 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1958 Henry V


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harvey Roy Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 12:30:29 EST
Subject: 15.1958 Henry V
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1958 Henry V

With all respect, it was never the task of a herald to engage in
espionage. The notion is interesting, but not consistent with chivalric
practice at that time, however barbaric wars were then, and now.

Harvey Roy Greenberg MD

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harvey Roy Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 12:32:34 EST
Subject: 15.1958 Henry V
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1958 Henry V

Re my previous posting, it would be more likely that there were spies in
or around Henry's camp to report directly back to the French, notably
with the lines so close. In the famous scene in the Dauphin's tent on
the night of the battle, I recall there was mention made of a gentleman
measuring the distance between the two camps, no espionage involved.
Which is not to say -- and well within the practice of the day -- that
there were as noted spies in English dress within Henry's camp itself.

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Greenblatt

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1968  Wednesday, 17 November 2004

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 15:52:23 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1956 Greenblatt

[2]     From:   David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 21:10:24 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1956 Greenblatt


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 15:52:23 -0500
Subject: 15.1956 Greenblatt
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1956 Greenblatt

 >"[I]t is likely that the actor who played Lady Montague must have
 >doubled in a character on stage at the end of the play (Shakespeare is
 >forced to explain her absence by having her die of grief); but was it
 >Paris? Friar Laurence?"
 >
 >On the one hand, this presumes that the role was played by a grown man
 >rather than a youth.

If (as I surmise) the doubled role was Paris, an adolescent would do
just fine.

 >On the other hand, it suggests that WS wrote the play with the idea in
 >mind of some actor doubling Lady M with a part that had to be on-stage
 >in the last scene. This seems unlikely to me.

Of course WS wrote with his materials in mind.  But it is just as likely
that when the time came to cast the parts the company found that Lady M
and, say, Paris could not be onstage at the same time, so WS added the
line about Lady M dying of grief.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 21:10:24 -0600
Subject: 15.1956 Greenblatt
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1956 Greenblatt

D Bloom wrote:

 >Larry Weiss writes
 >
 >"[I]t is likely that the actor who played Lady Montague must have
 >doubled in a character on stage at the end of the play (Shakespeare is
 >forced to explain her absence by having her die of grief); but was it
 >Paris? Friar Laurence?"
 >
 >On the one hand, this presumes that the role was played by a grown man
 >rather than a youth. It's possible, of course, but is there evidence to
 >suggest either that this sort of thing commonly happened, or that it
 >happened in this instance?

There is no evidence for grown men (i.e. sharers) playing any
substantial female role on the pre-Restoration stage.  Such roles were
invariably played by teenage apprentices, who ranged in age from about
13 to 21.  A boy at the higher end of this range might conceivably have
doubled as Paris, but Friar Lawrence would not have been possible.  In
the few cases we know of where a boy doubled a female role and a male
role, the male role was that of a page or a similarly young (teenage) male.

I know I've written about this numerous times on this list over the past
decade, but I have finally gathered all the evidence, including much
newly discovered documentary evidence, in an article which will appear
in Shakespeare Survey next year.

Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Sonnets & Stylometry

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1969  Wednesday, 17 November 2004

[1]     From:   Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 20:21:47 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1962 Sonnets & Stylometry

[2]     From:   Ward Elliott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 17:31:33 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1962 Sonnets & Stylometry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 20:21:47 -0000
Subject: 15.1962 Sonnets & Stylometry
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1962 Sonnets & Stylometry

Lawrence Hastings writes ...

 >Did Shakespeare write every one of the sonnets ascribed to him? I find
 >this question in publications more than 100 years old.

This shouldn't be too surprising.  Victorians were appalled that the
National Bard had addressed so much love poetry to a young man.

Peter Bridgman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ward Elliott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 17:31:33 -0800
Subject: 15.1962 Sonnets & Stylometry
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1962 Sonnets & Stylometry

We have tested 96 3,000-word blocks of Shakespeare verse and found only
four that had more than one rejection in 15 Shakespeare stylometric
tests.  None of these rejections were from the Sonnets.  We also tested
125 3,000-word verse blocks by other poets and playwrights; none had
fewer than 2 rejections.  We would suppose from these results that
Shakespeare's tested works, including the Sonnets, are by a single hand,
not a committee, and that the verses by others are by a different set of
hands.  From the evidence at hand, it looks as though our tests are
something like 96% accurate in saying "could-be" to Shakespeare and
something like 100% accurate in saying "couldn't-be" to non-Shakespeare.
  We attach much more importance to negative evidence than to positive,
but the sonnets do look much more consistent with the rest of
Shakespeare than with our available archive of non-Shakespeare.

What about the possibility that just a sonnet or two, of around 150
words each, might be by someone other than Shakespeare, and the
differences are buried in samples of 3,000 words?  We can't rule this
out, but the shortest block length we have tested systematically is 470
words, and the differences between Shakespeare and non-Shakespeare still
shine through, though not quite as clearly.  Only 3 of 38 such
Shakespeare sonnet blocks had two rejections (8%), while 29 of 40 such
blocks by other poets, 73%, had two or more rejections.  Our best guess,
consistent with what evidence we have, is that all or almost all, of the
Sonnets must be by the same person.

Ward Elliott

_______________________________________________________________
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opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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A Few Quick Words

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1967  Wednesday, 17 November 2004

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 2004 15:25:55 -0800
Subject:        A Few Quick Words

A Canadian businessman named Sean Shannon can't claim to be the world's
fastest talker, merely the most rapid reciter of Hamlet's "To be..."
soliloquy:  260 words in 23.8 seconds.  I tracked down the audio for
this feat at a BBC Polish ESL
site-http://www.bbc.co.uk/polish/specials/1447_extreme_eng/page9.shtml
(it starts at 1:44 into the audio segment).  He told Reuters what his
secret is:  "To reach that pitch of verbal perfection, Shannon finds it
best to empty the mind completely before embarking on his word sprints.
  'I think it is important NOT to think about what you are saying. I
gather newscasters do an entire newscast without understanding a word
they say. They just say it convincingly and this is probably the best
way.'"
http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsPackageArticle.jhtml?type=entertainmentNews&storyID=621979§ion=news

Exit, pursued by a black cat,
Al Magary

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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