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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: October ::
Can Anyone Help?
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1832  Wednesday, 6 October 2004

[1]     From:   Robin Headlam Wells <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Oct 2004 13:42:23 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?

[2]     From:   John Briggs <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Oct 2004 14:22:02 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?

[3]     From:   Al Magary <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Oct 2004 12:19:56 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Headlam Wells <
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Date:           Tuesday, 5 Oct 2004 13:42:23 +0100
Subject: 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?

Thank you very much indeed for your kind suggestion. Like you I always
go to Google first, but in this case I tried shaksper because none of
the Google hits had any connection with Chaucer.  I'm most grateful for
your help.

Best wishes,
Robin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Oct 2004 14:22:02 +0100
Subject: 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?

Margaret H Dupuis wrote:

 >A quick Google search of just one phrase ("She is the scarlet woman,
 >flaunting her wares")  yielded the following website:
 >
 >http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?disc=130375;article=1293;title=The%20Black
 >%20Tower%20-%20Wheel%20of%20Time%20RP
 >
 >As Undergraduate Director in the English Department of a large state
 >university, I find many occasions to check cases of suspected
 >plagiarism using Google.  It works almost every time.

Nearly almost every time!  Here's tip to Undergraduate Directors in
large state universities quickly checking Google: put phrases you wish
to search in quotation marks (" ") - or use the advanced search menu.

Oh, and if you find a site with all the search terms (e.g. by putting
<She is the scarlet woman, flaunting her wares>without quotation marks)
do check that the site actually contains the phrase before disciplining
the student!

John Briggs

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Magary <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Oct 2004 12:19:56 -0700
Subject: 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1820 Can Anyone Help?

 >A quick Google search of just one phrase ("She is the scarlet woman,
 >flaunting her wares")  yielded the following website:
 >
 >http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?disc=130375;article=1293;title=The%20Black
 >%20Tower%20-%20Wheel%20of%20Time%20RP

I carefully copied and pasted that URL and went to that site. There are
separate occurrences of "scarlet" and "woman," and "flaunting her wares"
appeared as a quote.  I doubt the teacher would find this useful
evidence on plagiarism.

I learned the lesson about Googling for exact phrases and
quotations--namely, you *must* enclose the search terms in quotes--in an
trivial thread on this list a couple of years ago concerning the
prevalence on the Internet of "Barbara Streisand" vs. "Barbra
Streisand."  (The latter, correct name now outnumbers the incorrect
version 337,000 to 107,000.)

Meanwhile, "She is the scarlet woman, flaunting her wares" in fact
produces no Google results.

Since we are thoroughly offtopic here, let me point out the usefulness
of two free websites, http://snipurl.com/ and http://tinyurl.com/ , that
reduce extremely long URLs to a snipped or tiny address, like this:
http://snipurl.com/9k4d This isn't recommended for bibliographic
purposes but it sure helps email users.

Cheers,
Al Magary

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