2004

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1859  Friday, 8 October 2004

From:           John Pendergast <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 07 Oct 2004 13:11:16 -0500
Subject:        Hamner and Warburton Editions

At the request of a colleague, I am forwarding this question to the
list. Editions of Shakespeare are way outside my area of expertise.
Please feel free to respond offllist at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Thanks.

The reference I'm trying to fill out is to "Hammer and Warburton" and
their (separate) editions of Shakespeare, which appeared in the 1740s --

that would be Sir Thomas Hanmer and Rev. William Warburton.

I'm trying to get a sense of the extent to which these editions altered
Shakespeare's words; in the source I'm annotating, Radcliffe's essay on
the supernatural in poetry, reference is made to how those editions
change the wording of a phrase in _Hamlet_ (from "good even" to "good
morning"). I'm curious to know just how extensive were the changes made
by these editors-- just a phrase here and there, in the name of
producing a "correct" text, or were the revisions more substantial?

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.