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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: October ::
Greenblatt
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1950  Thursday, 28 October 2004

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 00:44:34 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 00:48:02 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

[3]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 02:31:22 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

[4]     From:   John W. Kennedy <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 09:24:57 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

[5]     From:   Arthur Lindley<
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 21:31:29 +0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

[6]     From:   Debra Murphy <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 06:32:33 -0700
        Subj:   Re: Greenblatt


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 00:44:34 -0400
Subject: 15.1943 Greenblatt
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

 >look at how thematically revealing this possible doubling
 >could be: Sebastian and Maria are both social climbers, both
 >opportunists, and both are possessed of a "pleasing personality."

I am not sure I am convinced of this, but the subject of thematic
doubling fascinates me.  Some obvious ones that come to mind immediately
are:  Arthur & Henry III; Theseus & Oberon; Hyppolyta & Titania;
Mamillius & Perdita; Posthumus & Cloten; Cordelia & The Fool.

It becomes less obvious when the doubled roles are not thematically
connected.  For example, it is likely that the actor who played Lady
Montague must have doubled in a character on stage at the end of the
play (Shakespeare is forced to explain her absence by having her die of
grief); but was it Paris? Friar Laurence?  Similarly, it seems probable
that Laertes was played by one of the better actors -- it is a
significant part -- so it would have been uneconomical to make no use of
him for three full acts.  But which was the doubled role(s)?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 00:48:02 -0400
Subject: 15.1943 Greenblatt
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

 >if there actually were inns or places where
 >male/male relations took place, then that fact (if it could be
 >established) would challenge Foucault's insistence that in the
 >Renaissance, people did NOT define themselves by the type or types of
 >sex acts in which they engaged.

Hmmm.  One may speculate about the nature of the Widow Bull's
establishment in Deptford.  Why was there a bed in a dining room?  Or
did they serve dinner in a bedroom?  Or did Marlowe, Frizer and Skerres
repair to a bedroom after dinner?  If so to what end?  Or whose end?  (I
am not saying anything salacious -- just an innuendo.)

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 02:31:22 -0400
Subject: 15.1943 Greenblatt
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/sainta06.htm

ANTHONY the Abbot
Also known as Anthony of Egypt; Anthony the Great; Father of Cenobites;
Father of Western Monasticism

Memorial
     17 January

"Descriptions paint him as uniformly modest and courteous. His example
led many to take up the monastic life, and to follow his way. Friend
late in life of Saint Paul the Hermit, and buried the aged anchorite,
leading to his patronage of gravediggers. His biography was written by
his friend Saint Athanasius.

His relationship with pigs and patronage of swineherds is a little
complicated. Skin diseases were sometimes treated with applications of
pork fat, which reduced inflammation and itching. As Anthony's
intervention aided in the same conditions, he was shown in art
accompanied by a pig. People who saw the art work, but did not have it
explained, thought there was a direct connection between Anthony and
pigs - and people who worked with swine took him as their patron.

Name Meaning
     inestimable

Patronage
     against pestilence, amputees, animals, basket makers, basket
weavers, brushmakers, butchers, cemetery workers, domestic animals,
eczema, epilepsy, epileptics, ergotism (Saint Anthony's fire),
erysipelas, gravediggers, graveyards, hermits, hogs, Hospitallers,
monks, pigs, relief from pestilence, skin diseases, skin rashes, swine,
swineherds

Representation
     bell; book; crutch; hermit; man with a pig at his side; pig; Saint
Anthony's cross (T or tau-shaped); tau cross with a bell on the end.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 09:24:57 -0400
Subject: 15.1943 Greenblatt
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

 >(Incidentally, the on-line Catholic Encyclopedia has no mention of that
 >story or pigs in general. Is she merely pulling our legs - or hams as
 >the case may be?)

<URL:http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/sainta06.htm>

[St. Anthony's] relationship with pigs and patronage of swineherds is a
little complicated. Skin diseases were sometimes treated with
applications of pork fat, which reduced inflammation and itching. As
Anthony's intervention aided in the same conditions, he was shown in art
accompanied by a pig. People who saw the art work, but did not have it
explained, thought there was a direct connection between Anthony and
pigs - and people who worked with swine took him as their patron.

And on the other hand, from
<URL:http://www.pighealth.com/reviews/tantony.htm>:

While on a year of solitary retreat and prayer, St. Anthony had the
experience of being tempted by Satan who allegedly came to him in the
form of a fierce pig which viciously attacked him. Anthony saintly
resisted the temptation to return the favour and beat the pig to death,
whereupon he was enveloped by a "wondrous light" and the pig was
transformed into a humble and docile porcine companion.

(Either version, of course, confirms the connection.)

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Lindley<
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 21:31:29 +0800
Subject: 15.1943 Greenblatt
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1943 Greenblatt

Jack Heller <
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 >

 >Even though the word "homosexual" did not exist, certainly early modern
 >Englishmen in the theatre business were aware of same-sex erotic
 >resonances. So the question can be answered yes, "Sebastian" had
 >homoerotic connotations. To see this at work in a play, I would direct
 >one to the character of Sebastian Wengrave in Middleton and Dekker's The
 >Roaring Girl; he is consistently represented as erotically interested in
 >women dressed as men.
 >
 >Heller

I'm aware of that, Jack; I was making the customary distinction between
'homosexual' as designating an identity or personality type as vs.
someone who performs homosexual acts.  The persona of the Sonnets, for
example, represents himself as attracted both to the young man and the
dark lady.  He does not, on the whole, represent the latter desire as
contradicting some homosexual/sodomitic/whatever 'identity'. If the
audience of TN saw Antonio and Sebastian as essentially gay or straight,
I think, they would have missed the point of the play's presentation of
gender as fluid and performative.  The homoerotic feeling in that
relationship, however, seems to be almost entirely Antonio's rather than
Sebastian's.

Arthur

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Debra Murphy <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Oct 2004 06:32:33 -0700
Subject:        Re: Greenblatt

Speaking of Greenblatt, I have an editor of a Catholic magazine sending
me a review copy of Greenblatt's Will in the World with an eye for me to
review it, particularly with regard to Greenblatt's treatment of the
Catholic issues in the book.  But before I dig into it, I'd be curious
to hear what listmembers, especially those in academia, have to say
about the current status of Theory and New Historicism in general, and
Greenblatt in particular, in academic circles.  I hear it noised abroad
that Theory has lost a good deal of its former cachet of late, in Europe
even before in America, and would enjoy reading anyone's comments on the
subject.

For my own part, I am temperamentally and philosophically allergic to
the so-called School of Resentment, but always thought Greenblatt well
worth the read anyway, though it's been a few years.

Best regards,
Debra Murphy

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