2004

Question on Measure for Measure

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1757  Monday, 27 September 2004

From:           Julia Crockett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 18 Sep 2004 01:38:55 +0100
Subject: 15.1747 Question on Measure for Measure
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1747 Question on Measure for Measure

Having read Everett, Burnyeat, sage et al, there are outstanding
questions. So I ask to what extent does Plato figure in Shakespeare?

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A Shakespearean Blood Bath of Cabbages and Kings

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1756  Monday, 27 September 2004

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 26 Sep 2004 12:21:20 -0400
Subject:        A Shakespearean Blood Bath of Cabbages and Kings

A Shakespearean Blood Bath of Cabbages and Kings

September 21, 2004
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

The spooky sound of metal scraping metal signals from the start that
"Rose Rage," at the Duke on 42nd Street, is not, as you might imagine, a
comedy about dueling florists or a sweet tale of backyard botanists
squabbling over a contested variety. It's a hefty slab of Shakespeare:
all three parts of "Henry VI," in fact, trimmed of fat and put through a
meat grinder, then garnished with generous doses of directorial panache.
A freshly sharpened cleaver, not a dagger or a sword, is the weapon of
choice in Edward Hall's flashy, eminently accessible production, which
presents 15th-century England as a slaughterhouse doing big business,
where even the most privileged men are fated to become meat primed for
the butcher block.

The cheeky title alludes to the Wars of the Roses, the bloody battle for
England's throne that unfolds with variable theatrical effectiveness -
and scant attention to chronological accuracy - in the "Henry VI"
trilogy. The irreverence of Mr. Hall's production merely begins with the
bold stroke of scribbling a new title atop these early, little-loved and
rarely seen plays. (In taking that particular liberty he is following
the lead of his father, the eminent British director Peter Hall: In 1963
the senior Mr. Hall staged a version of the trilogy, along with Richard
III, under the title "The Wars of the Roses.")

The younger Mr. Hall, aided by Roger Warren, has drastically slashed the
original texts. The three plays are compressed into less than four hours
of stage time, about the allotment for a full-length "Hamlet." (With a
generous dinner break and two intermissions, "Rose Rage" requires about
five and a half hours.)

[ . . . ]

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/21/theater/reviews/
21rose.html?ex=1097215493&ei=1&en=57ceb89e8aaca021

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Judith's Wedding; Shakespeare's Death

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1754  Monday, 27 September 2004

From:           Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 23 Sep 2004 15:01:22 +1000
Subject:        Judith's Wedding; Shakespeare's Death

I'm working on something which may or may not turn into a play or a
script, based on the last months of Shakespeare's life. A couple of
questions I'd like to ask other SHAKSPEReans: why, in your opinion, did
Judith and Thomas Quiney marry in Lent and risk excommunication? Would
it have been a more sombre affair than normal? And also--have there been
any sustained interpretations or examinations made as to the nature of
Shakespeare's ill-health, leading to his death? Many books suggest he
was in failing health at least in the two years before his death, but
very sick by March 1616.

Thanks,
Sophie Masson
author site: www.northnet.com.au/~smasson

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Eric Sams / Edward III

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1755  Monday, 27 September 2004

From:           Chris Clark <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Sep 2004 18:20:27 +0100
Subject:        Eric Sams / Edward III

An obituary of Eric Sams by Edward Greenfield was published in The
Guardian on Wednesday September 22, 2004. You can read it at:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/obituaries/story/0,3604,1309661,00.html

Having read it through, one question occurs. I'm not greatly exercised
by questions of authorship, but Greenfield says Sams demonstrated that
Edward III was 'genuinely by the Bard and not collaboration, a point now
widely accepted.' Now, I saw the RSC's performance of the play during
the Jacobean season in London last year and it looked like juvenilia to
me - but my individual judgement is unimportant: what I want to ask
those members of this scholarly community who are in a position to know
is, is Sams' view - that the play was demonstrably solely by
Shakespeare, and not a collaboration - 'widely accepted', as Greenfield
says?

Chris Clark
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Help with Lear's Fool

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1753  Monday, 27 September 2004

From:           Marvin Bennet Krims <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Sep 2004 09:58:33 -0400
Subject:        Help with Lear's Fool.

I seek references to the deeper psychological aspects of Lear's Fool. By
that I mean, references that go beyond the obvious, such as comic
relief, astute commentator on Lear's "foolishness," and other such
obvious roles. I have searched several comprehensive data bases with
little effect.  You can also reply to me directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Can anyone out there help?

Marvin Krims

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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