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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: August ::
The Globes Audience in the Future
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1612  Tuesday, 31 August 2004

[1]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 2004 12:24:25 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1603 The Globes Audience in the Future

[2]     From:   Kate Pearce <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Aug 2004 22:11:33 +0100
        Subj:   The Globes Audience in the Future 2


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 2004 12:24:25 +0100
Subject: 15.1603 The Globes Audience in the Future
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1603 The Globes Audience in the Future

"If I were to take a guess at this moment, it seems like the late
Victorians first saw this cinematic approach to the stage, at the same
time that pictorial Shakespeare became the vogue. Still, the work of
Poel (authentic staging conditions) indicates a striving against that
fourth wall. Certainly by the time that film was widely distributed,
non-musical hall theatre was already darkening and quieting audiences in
a hope to achieve pictorial authenticity and to accommodate the
viewpoint that Shakespeare was high art, the equivalent in many ways, I
would argue, of opera."

Brian Willis's post sounds plausible.

Verdi and Wagner are surely key figures in this development?

m

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kate Pearce <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Aug 2004 22:11:33 +0100
Subject:        The Globes Audience in the Future 2

I'm thankful for the responses on The Globe's audiences in the future. I
have decided to do my dissertation on the comparison on the Globe's
audience in the Elizabethan times with the audiences today. I agree that
audience participation is not completely lost today, but I still feel
that we are a long way from how the Elizabethans acted. Being at a drama
school, I have worked (backstage) on plays that have put the audience
right in the centre of things. The reaction is fascinating; they simply
clump together and freeze up. It's like they are scared to be
incorporated with the actors play. I suppose there is comfort in being
able to sit in the dark and simply watch.

I suppose working in college, I'm not so scared to participate, but at
the Globe one the actors caught my eye, made a stance and pouted his
lips. The whole of the audience turned to look at the scene with
laughter and suddenly I was part of the performance. This happened to
others and they seemed to enjoy it. That started me thinking, as to
whether people enjoyed the attention or simply acted up to the actor? I
myself found it funny! Fun! For audience participation, does it help to
single out the audience member to break the clump? You can never tell
how that person will act; does that make it more interesting? It
certainly keeps the actor on his toes. The Elizabethan was much more
likely to seen with a beer in his hand than today, that surely must have
encouraged the clump to break.

Another thing that made me wonder was, in Elizabethan times the higher
class would not only go there to see a play, but also to be seen. They
sat in the boxes behind the stage, not only to listen and be out of the
sun, but mainly to be seen in their refinements. Why now (today) do
people pay to sit here (if they do pay) when all you can see is the back
of the play? No offence, but from my observation, it's not to show off
the wealth in clothes, they seem to look similar to the rest of the
audience.

Many thanks for your response.

Kate.

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