2004

Frank C. Baxter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1596  Thursday, 26 August 2004

[1]     From:   Bob Rosen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Aug 2004 13:25:37 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1582 Frank C. Baxter

[2]     From:   Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Aug 2004 15:57:46 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1582 Frank C. Baxter


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Rosen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Aug 2004 13:25:37 EDT
Subject: 15.1582 Frank C. Baxter
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1582 Frank C. Baxter

 >Dr. Frank Baxter was the genial, talking head host (accompanied by maps,
 >stills, etc.) in a program of educational films, called "The Fair
 >AdventureSeries," made to celebrate the Shakespeare Quadricentennial
 >observation in 1964.

As I recall Frank Baxter, he originally ran a TV show on poetry. He
didn't like convoluted modern modes. He preferred poetry that made a
clear statement.  That said, he could discuss the technique the poet
used as it reinforced the subject and he gloried in the beauty of the
metaphors and language. He also analyzed a number of Shakespeare's
sonnets. I wonder if his tapes survive.

Bob Rosen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Aug 2004 15:57:46 -0400
Subject: 15.1582 Frank C. Baxter
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1582 Frank C. Baxter

The University of Georgia owns a number of the Frank Baxter videos
(probably these were nominated for Peabody Awards).  For more
information, go to http://gil.uga.edu and search for Frank C. Baxter.
Our holdings are generally strong, thanks to the Peabody Awards!

Fran Teague
http://www.english.uga.edu/~fteague

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The Meaning of Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1595  Thursday, 26 August 2004

From:           Kenneth Chan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Aug 2004 16:06:28 +0800
Subject:        The Meaning of Hamlet

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

I am presenting here, for your learned discussion and criticism, an
interpretation of Hamlet which I hope you will find worthy of
consideration. It explains, under a single coherent theme, practically
every puzzling aspect of the play. This understanding of Hamlet also
consistently fits what is openly presented in the play, and does not
rely on the need to read between the lines or to speculate on hidden
actions.

It appears to me that Shakespeare has meticulously crafted every part of
Hamlet to convey a profound spiritual message. This message
reverberates, scene after scene, throughout the play with unmistakable
consistency, and can be summarized as five inter-related themes:

1) The need to recognize the mystery world we are all in and the
importance of accepting the inevitability of death and facing the profound.

2) Our propensity, instead, to hide from the truth by indulging in
distractions and by artificially beautifying what is rotten inside.

3) How as a result of being false to ourselves in this way, we end up
being false to others.

4) The question we need to ask of whether we are not, in fact, mad in
doing all this.

5) Why revenge and condemnation of others is wrong, and how an
acceptance of reality and the inevitability of death, coupled with this
frame of mind, is a disaster.

These themes in Hamlet are repeated throughout the play like an endless
echo. Understanding the meaning of Hamlet in this way also explains
practically all the puzzling aspects of the play, including the following:

     * the reason for Hamlet's delay in exacting his revenge;
     * why Hamlet himself is unsure why he delays;
     * the purpose of the long swearing ritual at the end of Act I;
     * the reason for Polonius's long dialogue with Reynaldo;
     * why the status of Hamlet's madness is ambiguous;
     * the purpose of the long dramatic recitation on Pyrrhus;
     * the reason for Hamlet's savage treatment of Ophelia;
     * the meaning of the "To be" soliloquy;
     * the reason for Hamlet's advice (on acting) to the players;
     * why the King does not react to the dumb show;
     * why Hamlet lacks remorse after accidentally killing Polonius;
     * the meaning behind the nature of Ophelia's death;
     * the purpose of the long graveyard scene;
     * why Hamlet grapples in fury with Laertes at the gravesite;
     * the purpose of the prolonged dialogue with Osric;
     * the meaning behind the final duel scene.

All the above, and more, can be shown to be artistic means for imparting
the central message in Hamlet. I will be happy, on this Forum, to
elaborate further on this, and welcome any comments or discussion. I
believe it is important to understand the spiritual meaning of the play
because it reveals that Hamlet is nothing short of an artistic miracle,
reflected both in its poetic brilliance and in the profundity of its
message.

The points introduced here are largely taken from my book "Quintessence
of Dust."
(See http://www.hamlet.vze.com or the publisher's site at
http://www.iuniverse.com/bookstore/book_detail.asp?isbn=059531337X )

There is, however, no need to read the book for this discussion - I will
clarify what I mean above as required.

Regards
Kenneth Chan

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Review of Comedy of Errors

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1593  Thursday, 26 August 2004

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Aug 2004 18:54:02 -0400
Subject:        Review of Comedy of Errors

Order Archly Bows to Sweet Confusion
August 25, 2004
By EDWARD ROTHSTEIN

LENOX, Mass., Aug. 24 -Each "Comedy of Errors" has its own Ephesus. And
here in Lenox, at the Founders' Theater, which sits on 63 acres
belonging to Shakespeare and Company, Shakespeare's legendary locale has
become a tropical paradise, an amusement park and a place for
resurrected comic routines. Cape Verdian music slinks and bustles;
periscopes and blue accordion-snakes emerge from the floor; a rotating
yellow tea cup carries mismatched lovers to their assignations.

[ . . . ]

THE COMEDY OF ERRORS

By William Shakespeare; directed by Cecil MacKinnon; sets
by Kris Stone; sound by Jason Fitzgerald; lights by Lap-Chi
Chu; costumes by Arthur Oliver; assistant designers, Rachel
Gordon and Sarah Hilliard; production stage manager, Molly
Elizabeth McCarter; dance/movement director, Susan Dibble.
Presented by Shakespeare and Company, 70 Kemble Street,
Lenox, Mass.

WITH: Michael Milligan (Antipholus of Syracuse), Tony
Molina (Dromio of Syracuse), Dan McCleary (Dromio of
Ephesus), Elizabeth Aspenlieder (Adriana), Anne Gottlieb
(Luciana) and George Hannah (Antipholus of Ephesus).

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/25/theater/reviews/25erro.html?ex=1094472769&ei=1&en=161152fbe917ab87

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Fortinbras (Hamlet and Iraq) on in New York

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1594  Thursday, 26 August 2004

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Aug 2004 08:02:06 -0400
Subject:        Fortinbras (Hamlet and Iraq) on in New York

Paul Rudd as Fortinbras
By Lee Blessing (A Walk in the Woods, Thief River)

Featuring Dallas Roberts (Nocturne, Burn This), Daniel Breaker (Pericles),

Written after the first Gulf War, this uproarious look at what happens
after Hamlet is a timely satire on power, politics, and war.

Directed by Jesse Berger (Pericles)

LOCATION
The Culture Project
45 Bleecker Street & Lafayette
Trains: 6, N/R/W, F/V
www.45bleecker.com

RESERVATIONS
All readings are FREE, except Fortinbras

For the Fortinbras Benefit with Paul Rudd: go to www.TheaterMania.com or
call 212.352.3101

For all other readings: write Revelations@redbulltheatercom or call
212.414.5168

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Paper Now Available

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1592  Thursday, 26 August 2004

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, August 26, 2004
Subject:        Paper Now Available

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

David Richman's Hamlet's Night of Comic Horror: Implications for
Performance Derived from the "Bad Quarto" is now available in the Papers
section of the SHAKSPER web site:

http://www.shaksper.net/review-papers/index.html

Comments can be sent to David Richman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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