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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: July ::
CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1387  Monday, 5 July 2004

[1]     From:   Jack Hettinger <
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        Date:   Friday, 2 Jul 2004 10:10:40 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[2]     From:   Norman Hinton <
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        Date:   Friday, 02 Jul 2004 10:27:45 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[3]     From:   W.L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 02 Jul 2004 12:45:12 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[4]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Friday, 2 Jul 2004 14:02:40 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[5]     From:   Cary DiPietro <
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        Date:   Saturday, 03 Jul 2004 10:26:31 +0900
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Hettinger <
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Date:           Friday, 2 Jul 2004 10:10:40 -0400
Subject: 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Terence Hawkes tells us that clarity is bad business: "Why do some of
our colleagues assume that 'clarity' in language is a free-floating,
essential and transhistorical quality? By and large it consists of  a
number of tricks of style validated for the purpose by particular social
groupings at specific times. Its avid pursuit is usually the last resort
of fools and scoundrels."

Terence, this is stupid stuff:
You prate your vitriol fast enough;
But you mock clarity while being clear,
And turn yourself upon your ear.
But, oh, good Lord, the claims you make,
They give a chap the belly-ache.

Apologies to Housman.

Jack

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman Hinton <
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Date:           Friday, 02 Jul 2004 10:27:45 -0500
Subject: 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Whereas obscurity is --what ?  and why should we value it ? (I don't buy
the "this is so complex that I have to be complex, too" excuse)

 >Why do some of our colleagues assume that 'clarity' in language is a
 >free-floating, essential and transhistorical quality? By and large it
 >consists of  a number of tricks of style validated for the purpose by
 >particular social groupings at specific times. Its avid pursuit is
 >usually the last resort of fools and scoundrels.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 02 Jul 2004 12:45:12 -0400
Subject: 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Terence Hawkes opines that: "By and large it [i.e. clarity] consists of
  a number of tricks of style validated for the purpose by particular
social groupings at specific times. Its avid pursuit is usually the last
resort of fools and scoundrels."

What are these tricks? And how, pray tell, can a particular social
grouping -- whatever that may be -- validate a number of tricks?

Fools and scoundrels?  Perhaps the pursuit of clarity should be the
chief occupation of teachers of English. Are teachers all fools and
scoundrels?

Is Professor Hawkes in favor of misleading political language?  If
Professor Hawkes want to know what misleading political language is, I
suggest that he analyze the language of Mr. Bush.

Bill Godshalk

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Friday, 2 Jul 2004 14:02:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

I find myself in the odd position (for me) of agreeing wholeheartedly
with Bill Arnold and disagreeing with T.Hawkes, who said:

 >Why do some of our colleagues assume that 'clarity' in language is a
 >free-floating, essential and transhistorical quality? ... Its avid
 >pursuit is
 >usually the last resort of fools and scoundrels.

I have always considered Prof Hawkes's submissions to be the
quintessence of clarity and would hold them up as models to be emulated.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cary DiPietro <
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Date:           Saturday, 03 Jul 2004 10:26:31 +0900
Subject: 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1380 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Terence Hawkes writes:

 >'Why do some of our colleagues assume that 'clarity' in language is a
 >free-floating, essential and transhistorical quality? By and large it
 >consists of  a number of tricks of style validated for the purpose by
 >particular social groupings at specific times. Its avid pursuit is
 >usually the last resort of fools and scoundrels.'

Maybe so, but I imagine that, if they don't have a publisher yet, it
will be on the basis of their densely theoretical language and thus,
highly restricted potential market for their book (and I think there is
ample evidence of this already demonstrated here), that their proposed
collection will be turned down.  Even within their very limited academic
readership, surely there are enough fools and scoundrels (myself
included) to warrant some simplification of, if not their meaning, then
the very dense style of their writing.

On another note, with Shakespeare a central feature of both secondary
and post-secondary English curriculla, and with established Shakespeare
festivals and a solid history of Shakespeare in performance, I fail to
see how Canada's relationship to the canon is ambivalent.

Cary DiPietro

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