Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: July ::
CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1407  Friday, 9 July 2004

[1]     From:   Jack Heller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 8 Jul 2004 13:15:12 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1403 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[2]     From:   Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 8 Jul 2004 13:47:04 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1403 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[3]     From:   David Bishop <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 8 Jul 2004 18:21:54 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1357 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 8 Jul 2004 13:15:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 15.1403 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1403 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

On literary theories, there are those I think I understand well, and
those I would have to review. A little Google search turned up this
helpful link on "Intertextuality" with references to Kristeva:
http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/sem09.html

After reading that, the original call for papers seems perfectly clear
to me. Let's get off this merry-go-round and here from those who
submitted abstracts in response.

Jack Heller
Huntington College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 8 Jul 2004 13:47:04 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 15.1403 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1403 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Gabriel Egan writes, "I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest that
Arnold's bluffing and didn't really understand the CFP at all.  It'd be
easy to prove me wrong, Bill. I invite you to define Kristeva's term
'intertextuality' (or, indeed, 'intertextualite', as she called it). Any
professor of English (or, I should hope, classics) ought to be able to
do that.  Once that's received by the list...."

OK: "bluffing" you say?  How *much* is in the pot?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Bishop <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 8 Jul 2004 18:21:54 -0400
Subject: 15.1357 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1357 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Marry, this is miching malicho. It means mischief.

The above quotation from Hamlet, when posted on this list, becomes, I
take it, an "intertextual transference of text between signifying
systems". If we call this list a text, and Hamlet a text, then a small
text, the quote, has been transferred from one text to another. If we
call texts signifying systems, then a signifying system has been
transferred from one signifying system to another. Are the words
"intertextual" and "signifying systems" therefore redundant?

Why could one not replace the phrase "the intertextual transference of
text between signifying systems" with the word "quotation"? This would
yield, "Thirty years have passed since Julia Kristeva argued that
quotation complements displacement and condensation as fundamental
signifying processes in the unconscious." The question then might come
up, what is displacement, and how does it differ from "transference" or
quotation? Does displacement extend beyond quotation to include,
perhaps, allusion? Or could we reduce the sentence again, to "quotation
and condensation"? Or do displacement and condensation simply correspond
to metaphor and metonymy?  Finally, why are these actions "fundamental
signifying processes in the unconscious"? How does their role in the
unconscious differ from their role in the conscious?

Much more could be asked along these lines, about every sentence of this
passage. Those who defend it as "lucid"--even if understandably opaque
to amateurs, bigots and the intellectually lazy--apparently do not trip
over any such questions in their admiring perusal of this critical
prose. No doubt they will feel these questions signify nothing but
unreasoning hostility. In that case, circling the wagons and preaching
to the choir seems like a perfectly reasonable response.

Best wishes,
David Bishop

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.