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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: July ::
Sonnet 89
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1425  Wednesday, 14 July 2004

[1]     From:   John W. Kennedy <
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        Date:   Tue, 13 Jul 2004 10:17:21 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Tue, 13 Jul 2004 12:21:08 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89

[3]     From:   Ward Elliott <
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        Date:   Tue, 13 Jul 2004 13:13:55 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89

[4]     From:   Margaret Hopkins <
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        Date:   Tue, 13 Jul 2004 21:45:19 +0100
        Subj:   Sonnet 89 (Shakespeare's Lameness

[5]     From:   John Ramsay <
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        Date:   Tue, 13 Jul 2004 16:58:11 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89

[6]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Wednesday, July 14, 2004
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <
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Date:           Tue, 13 Jul 2004 10:17:21 -0400
Subject: 15.1415 Sonnet 89
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89

 >Does any evidence for Shakespeare's lameness exist?
 >
 >In Sonnet 89, he speaks of "my lameness" and of being "absent from thy
 >walks".

He does not speak of "my lameness"; rather, he promises that if the
addressee should speak of him as lame, he will immediately commence
limping.  Remember Helena's "I am your spaniel"?  That's what's going on
in this poem.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Tue, 13 Jul 2004 12:21:08 -0400
Subject: 15.1415 Sonnet 89
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89

There's no evidence for lameness in this sonnet.

"Speak of my lameness and I straight will halt
Against thy reasons making no defense."

Say I'm lame and I'll start limping,
I'm not gonna say you're wrong.

The part where he writes "absent from thy walks" is him saying, "if you
want me gone, I'm gone."

This is set in future tense. It's a speculation. It isn't what is.

That said, however, I will note that there is a place for lameness in
Shakespeare's thinking, but he associates it with people who have crappy
reasons for what they do: Claudius in Hamlet, Claudio in Much Ado, and
Claudio in Measure. Those names mean "lame" and we know Shakespeare paid
careful attention to his characters' names.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ward Elliott <
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Date:           Tue, 13 Jul 2004 13:13:55 -0700
Subject: 15.1415 Sonnet 89
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1415 Sonnet 89

Sonnet 37 is filled with references to the author's lameness and
decrepitude, "I, made lame by Fortune's dearest spite," for example, 

 

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