2004

Cheapshakes!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1374  Friday, 2 July 2004

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Jul 2004 16:52:40 -0700
Subject:        Cheapshakes!

Item from a Playbill story about the move of the Royal Shakespeare
Company to a permanent home in the West End, possibly the Albery
(http://www.playbill.com/news/article/87121.html):

"The RSC has announced that Boyd's new production of Hamlet, starring
Toby Stephens, will be previewed with no sets or costumes in the
Stratford High School on July 5. Their student audience will be aged
between 15 and 17 and, following in the techniques of legendary director
Peter Brook, Boyd believes the production will gain from the experience.
In a press release, he said, 'This is an exercise in narrative clarity.
Young people are objective and want to engage fully with the story, and
a good way to foster this is to play in a school hall without . .  .
sophisticated effects.' It is, he confirmed, a process he plans to
continue."

If this a valid approach, why is it confined to a high school stage?  Is
the RSC merely being Cheapshakes?

Maybe I am too cynical, after hearing this kind of
look-on-the-bright-side argument too often out of Washington DC.

Cheers,
Al Magary

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1373  Thursday, 1 July 2004

[1]     From:   R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 08:27:22 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[2]     From:   Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 11:12:58 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[3]     From:   Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 10:38:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[4]     From:   Philip Weller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 09:22:31 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[5]     From:   Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 16:48:57 +0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[6]     From:   Pat Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 11:50:25 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[7]     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 15:41:36 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

[8]     From:   David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 15:42:59 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 08:27:22 -0500
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

 >"Thirty years have passed since Julia Kristeva argued that the
 >intertextual transference of text between signifying systems complements
 >displacement and condensation as fundamental signifying processes in the
 >unconscious.... At the same time, studies of colonial and postcolonial
 >Shakespearean impositions, adaptations and appropriations have led to
 >dynamic debates over the use of intertextual strategies by postcolonial
 >writers seeking to deconstruct canonical givens and to destabilize
 >Eurocentric epistemological power in order to build decolonizing
 >counter-discourses."

This passage defies transliteration, but the meta-textual message is, or
should be; run away, run away, run away. I don't recall whether it was
Richard Levin, Brian Vickers, or Alan Sokal who did the best send up of
Kristeva, but there are any number of works by substantial scholars that
adequately deal with Kristeva and the school of French Ninnies to which
she belong (s?)(d?).

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 11:12:58 -0300
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

The status of Shakespeare in Canada is a complex one. Canada's best
known and most influential theatre company is located in Stratford,
Ontario, which already says a lot about Canadian cultural identity.

We happily name our towns after English towns and are happy to leave
them that way (Berlin, Ontario is now Kitchener, by the by); Queen
Elizabeth II nobly adorns our currency, and we kick off the summer (such
as it is) with Victoria Day.

But at the same time, Canadians are fiercely defensive about their
status as a full-fledged nation of the world and we see ourselves as
having grown up from the days of Empire. Gone is the Union Jack from
national buildings, replaced by the Canadian Maple Leaf; "Dominion Day"
has been renamed "Canada Day"; I don't know anyone who knows the words
to "God Save the Queen"; and pants are NOT what we wear under our
trousers, thank you very much.

Canadians, in other words, value things that are English because they
set us apart from our US neighbours who we both idolize and fear, but we
are simultaneously suspicious of things English because they imply a
second-rate status in the world.

So it is perhaps fitting that our national theatre is in Stratford, is
devoted mainly to Shakespeare, and caters to Americans from New York and
Michigan.

Now, is Shakespeare "English" in the national sense?  Does modern
England have a greater claim on Shakespeare than other English-speaking
nations?  Perhaps not. Canada did not descend from modern England, after
all, it descended from an England that is long gone just as modern
England did. So Canada is not really the daughter of England; Canada is
the sister of England. England just happens to still live at home. Thus,
Shakespeare is arguably the greatest author in Canadian history.

Now, let us turn to the matter of French translations...

t.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 10:38:00 -0500
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

At least back in the days of New Criticism we conducted our discourses
mostly in English (except for Empson, of course).

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Philip Weller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 09:22:31 -0700
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

I wouldn't even try to translate the passage about Kristeva because I
don't trust the judgment of anyone who uses such language and who thinks
the point of talking about Shakespeare is "to build decolonizing
counter-discourse."

--Philip Weller

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 16:48:57 +0000
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

 >Can someone translate this passage?

I should think that most of us (if we had the time) would be able to
paraphrase that passage with considerable ease. I think that it is a
rather lucid set of sentences. There are accessible ways into the
thinking of Julia Kristeva and her followers. A preliminary list of
useful sources would consist of Graham Allen, 'Intertextuality' (1999),
from Routledge's splendid 'New Critical Idiom' series; Peter Barry,
'English in Practice' (Arnold, 2003), pp. 37-49; and the entries on
'Intertextuality' in Jeremy Hawthorn, 'A Glossary of Literary Theory'
(4th edition; Arnold, 2000), pp. 182-84 and R. Murfin and S.M. Ray, 'The
Bedford Glossary of Literary Terms' (2nd edition; Bedford/St. Martin's,
2003), pp. 219-20.

Regarding Canadians' complicated responses to Shakespeare see, to begin
with, D. Brydon and I.R. Makaryt, eds, 'Shakespeare in Canada: A World
Elsewhere?' (Uni. of Toronto Press, 2003), and Ric Knowles, 'Shakespeare
and Canada: Essays on Production, Translation, and Adaptation' (Peter
Lang, 2004).

Kevin De Ornellas
Queen's University, Belfast

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 11:50:25 -0500
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Taking the second question first. I googled "Shakespeare, Canada, First,
Nations" and came up with the Internet Shakespeare Editions, affiliated
with the University of Victoria as the first hit. Here's what they had
to say:

"Reinforcing the mobilization in the 1970s against British and American
cultural influences was a groundswell of alternative theatres with their
political and artistic revolt against large regional theatres, which
represented the bulk of professional theatre in Canada and most of the
dollars. Surprisingly, however, alternative theatre has been very
receptive to a re-reading of the classics, including Shakespeare, and
has often quickly blurred into the mainstream, as may be seen by the
example of Quebec actor, director, and filmmaker Robert Lepage, who
quickly moved from alternative to mainstream commercial theatres and
became an internationally-acclaimed theatre wizard. Protesting against
the "colonial" attitudes and traditions of British and French-born
directors, against American imports, alternative Shakespeare has often
been "de-stabilized" or "de-centred"; that is, contrary to the populist
desire for entertainment found in summer Shakespeare, alternative
versions staged a politically-charged and serious Bard."

This version of Shakespeare is in implicit contrast to the outdoor,
canonical Shakespeare exemplified by Stratford. (Think of a First
Nations version of the Tempest that present Ariel & Caliban as victims
and Prospero as a colonial aggressor. Trite maybe, but...) The point is
that Canada has always been ambivalent about England and now the U.S.
and Shakespeare has always been bundled up with those countries
cultural/ideological identity. (Did anyone see the Aquila version of
Othello, with the multiple mentions of Laura Bush in the introduction?)

As for the Kristeva, it's hard for me to translate, because it seems to
me that it's in plain English already. What's being said is that 1.
Thirty years ago Kristeva identified intertextual transference as a
process the unconscious uses to process and transform ideas, along with
processes familiar from Freud, such as displacement and condensation.
(I'll bet, although I do not know, that the Freud here is the Freud of
Interpretation of Dreams. The question that I'd ask Kristeva--or this
writer--is how exactly intertextual transference differs from
displacement.) 2. Meanwhile writers opposed to colonialism began using
Shakespearean texts against institutions they took to be colonial, and
arguments arose about whether such interventions could succeed and which
versions of them were appropriate.

I think the problem may be that the writer here assumes that her
audience knows Kristeva well--text, context and influence. It certainly
sounds as though she's going after other game and setting the scene.

Just by the way, I had occasion to spend the last school year as a
social work intern in a VA hospital. If you want to look at truly
impenetrable, jargon-filled prose, check out physicians' charting.

Cheers,
Pat

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 15:41:36 -0400
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

 >"Thirty years have passed since Julia Kristeva argued that the
 >intertextual transference of text between signifying systems complements
 >displacement and condensation as fundamental signifying processes in the
 >unconscious.... At the same time, studies of colonial and postcolonial
 >Shakespearean impositions, adaptations and appropriations have led to
 >dynamic debates over the use of intertextual strategies by postcolonial
 >writers seeking to deconstruct canonical givens and to destabilize
 >Eurocentric epistemological power in order to build decolonizing
 >counter-discourses."

Perhaps this passage would be easier to interpret if it were translated
into French -- or if it contained a few concrete, specific details.

Bill Godshalk

[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 15:42:59 -0400
Subject: 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1368 CFP - Shakespearean Intertexts in Canada

Marry, this is miching malicho. It means mischief.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

As You Like It in the Classroom

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1371  Thursday, 1 July 2004

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 08:58:06 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1366 As You Like It in the Classroom

[2]     From:   Jack Hettinger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 13:31:30 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1366 As You Like It in the Classroom


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 08:58:06 -0400
Subject: 15.1366 As You Like It in the Classroom
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1366 As You Like It in the Classroom

 >My theory is that the play is too optimistic and sunny

But with very bitter leavening.  It has occurred to me that this play
contrasts unreasonable pessimism (Jaques) with equally ridiculous
optimism (sweet uses of adversity).

Perhaps, if there is a golden thread that runs through the canon, it is
"all things in moderation," including moderation (Hamlet).

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Hettinger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 13:31:30 -0400
Subject: 15.1366 As You Like It in the Classroom
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1366 As You Like It in the Classroom

Ed Taft says, "I teach AYLI often, and I've encountered the same problem
as Jack Heller.... In recent years, the play that grabs their attention
is M for M. It's more 'realistic' and 'earthy.'" M for M greatly
interests my students too, for the same reasons Ed mentions. One topic
that seems to seize the whole class is if Isabella should indeed comply
with Angelo so Claudio can live. Claudio's speech to the  disguised Duke
makes them sweat profusely (me too); male and female see Claudio's logic
as invincible, never mind that Angelo is dishonorable. Many allege
Isabella's voluptuous declaration about martyrdom is masochism; surely
no normal person would embrace death as a lover for the sake of an
abstraction. And most classes over the years have interpreted Isabella's
"silence" at the end as acceptance rather than rejection of the Duke's
proposal.

What do others' students say?

Jack Hettinger

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Measured Response

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1372  Thursday, 1 July 2004

[1]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 12:19:44 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1367 Measured Response

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 12:19:55 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1367 Measured Response

[3]     From:   Pat Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 14:13:43 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1354 Measured Response


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 12:19:44 -0400
Subject: 15.1367 Measured Response
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1367 Measured Response

Stuart Manger, Shakespeare's Catholic clerics always give wonderful
advice.  Warm, loving, seductive advice. But it's always wrong, no
matter how right it sounds. No matter how right it might be if all
worked out in the best of all possible worlds.  As for Prince Escalus,
dear God! This man has screwed up from the get go. He's a classic
Shakespearean Ruler Who Refuses to Rule.  All threats, no action. I'll
be mean to you next time. As a result, everything escalates. He rails at
the parents? HE is THEIR parent! Nice of him to show up at the end.

I fully understand that Friar Laurence has been conventionally
interpreted with adulation lo these many years. He says all the right
things. When princes and parents fail in their duty, their children come
under the sway of such men. And die.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 12:19:55 -0400
Subject: 15.1367 Measured Response
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1367 Measured Response

"To be honest I get a little weary of the nunnery/brothel gloss."

Don Bloom, is it your belief that Shakespeare's brain turned its
synaptic associations off for R&J and on for Hamlet? Or, since Hamlet
was later, that Will didn't find out about that association until he was
more mature?

What is your evidence, other than a beautiful altruism, that Juliet
would be welcomed or provided for by either family?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 14:13:43 -0500
Subject: 15.1354 Measured Response
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1354 Measured Response

 >To a contemporary audience though, torture and martyrdom were not
 >fantasies, they were realities.

Torture and martyrdom are still realities today, alas. The question is,
how is it possible for us to forget or deny them?

I agree that a crude Freudian account of Isabella's lines won't help us.
But Shakespeare's contemporaries had accounts of how and why people like
Southwell, Clitheroe, or earlier protestant martyrs would suffer
horrific pain and humiliation when the religion they died for was wrong.
See the government-inspired pamphlets of the Elizabethan period and
Thomas More's depressingly vicious anti-Protestant polemics for
speculation about why someone might be so depraved (the word then was
frequently "desparate") as to court suffering for a diabolical cause.
I'm not sure this gets us anywhere with Isabella, but suggesting that
her lines would be validated by the discourse of martyrdom of the time
strikes me as too broad.

Whatever else is true, what she resists when she resists Antonio is, in
modern terms, rape, not sex. I tend to read her novitiate as telling us
more about Antonio (he'd rape a nun) and Claudio (he'd countenance the
rape of his sister to save his life) than her, but then I don't tend to
read Shakespearean characters all that psychologically.

Cheers,
Pat

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Romeo and Juliet Original Pronunciation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1370  Thursday, 1 July 2004

[1]     From:   William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 10:07:09 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1365 Romeo and Juliet Original Pronunciation

[2]     From:   William Sutton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 09:11:50 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1365 Romeo and Juliet Original Pronunciation

[3]     From:   Ward Elliott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 17:09:34 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1365 Romeo and Juliet Original Pronunciation

[4]     From:   Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Jul 2004 10:21:59 +0100
        Subj:   Romeo and Juliet Original Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jun 2004 10:07:09 -0400
Subject: 15.1365 Romeo and Juliet Original Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1365 Romeo and Juliet Original Pronunciation

As I believe was pointed out in an earlier posting, almost all of the
questions posed in today's postings from HR Greenberg, Kathy Dent, and
Roger Gross can be found in David Crystal's article in the most recent
issue (27, summer 2004) of "Around the Globe," pp. 14-15  Although this
publication is available online at the Globe's web site
(http://www.shakespeares-globe.org/navigation/framesetNS.htm), I find
that the most recent issue is not there yet, but it appears you can
order copies online from this site for 


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