Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: June ::
Lear
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1270  Tuesday, 15 June 2004

[1]     From:   Edward Brown <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:23:26 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[2]     From:   Jack Heller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:24:03 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[3]     From:   Markus Marti <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 15:29:04 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[4]     From:   Bruce W. Richman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:49:04 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[5]     From:   Colin Cox <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:02:24 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[6]     From:   John-Paul Spiro <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 11:28:52 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[7]     From:   Peter Bridgman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 16:46:51 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[8]     From:   Alfredo Michel Modenessi <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 10:53:55 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[9]     From:   Thomas Pendleton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 17:02:56 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1252 Lear

[10]     From:  Hardy M. Cook <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, June 15, 2004
        Subj:   SHK 15.1252 Lear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Brown <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:23:26 -0500
Subject: 15.1252 Lear
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1252 Lear

I think the Richard Eyre/Masterpiece Theatre with Ian Holm as Lear is
very fine.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:24:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 15.1252 Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

Would Kurosawa's Ran count?

Jack Heller

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Markus Marti <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 15:29:04 +0200
Subject: 15.1252 Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

No joke, the best:

Grigori Kozintsev, "Korol Lir", original Russian with English subtitles;
music by Shostakovich (U.S.S.R., 1969)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064553/

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bruce W. Richman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:49:04 -0500
Subject: 15.1252 Lear
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1252 Lear

Peter Brook's film, released in the early 70s and starring Paul
Scofield, exasperated me at the time for its textual cuts. I saw it in a
New York theater with a good sound system when it was first released,
and recall that Scofield muttered and spit, rather than raged, his
lines, which sometimes made them difficult to hear, particularly because
a vicious wind howled behind him during much of the performance.
Nevertheless, you're probably familiar enough with the lines to amplify
your hearing satisfactorily, and textual abridgments are a lamentable
but inescapable fact of life nowadays, Branagh's Hamlet notwithstanding.
  Filmed beautifully in black and white during a Danish winter, the
cinematography is as bleakly terrifying as the text itself. The early
medieval scenic details, like the knights at their mess, were accurate,
powerful, and consistently supportive of the play's view of an
unrelentingly harsh and bitter world.  The blinding and storm scenes in
particular have remained vivid in my visual memory for more than thirty
years, which I credit to the film maker's skill. Though it has some
shortcomings, this is the best Lear I've seen, on stage or on film.

Bruce W. Richman
Dept. of Psychiatry
University of Missouri School of Medicine

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin Cox <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:02:24 -0700
Subject: 15.1252 Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1252 Lear

 >Would anyone like to recommend the best movie version of King Lear
 >available on DVD or VHS?

Kurosawa's 'Ran'.

Colin Cox

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John-Paul Spiro <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 11:28:52 -0400
Subject: 15.1252 Lear
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1252 Lear

Peter Brook's 1970 "King Lear" with Paul Scofield is the best movie
version.  It's a great film--brilliantly photographed, acted, directed.
  It is a very dark interpretation of the play, though, and it cuts much
of the text.  You should watch it along with Kozintzev's 1971 "King
Lear" with J

 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.