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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: June ::
Thighs and Sighs
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1271  Tuesday, 15 June 2004

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:54:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1261 Thighs and Sighs

[2]     From:   Claude Caspar <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 09:12:30 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1261 Thighs and Sighs

[3]     From:   Graham Hall <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 18:31:34 +0000
        Subj:   Bury my dagger at slashed thigh

[4]     From:   Michael B. Luskin <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Jun 2004 14:39:46 EDT
        Subj:   thighs and sighs


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 08:54:44 -0400
Subject: 15.1261 Thighs and Sighs
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1261 Thighs and Sighs

Here's other example, very far away from Shakespeare, but nevertheless
of possible interest in terms of wounds as displacements.  In the
disaster flick the Day After Tomorrow, a young woman gets a cut on her
though from a car bumper (she is fully clothed and we only register the
cut by a shot of the blood flowing from her underwater).  When she gets
sick, other characters pull up her skirt to reveal the wound on her
thigh.  It looks very much like a vagina (made grotesque in this case).
  Very David Cronenberg.

Best,
Richard

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Caspar <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 09:12:30 -0400
Subject: 15.1261 Thighs and Sighs
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1261 Thighs and Sighs

 >No academic sources here, but the theme of a king (or Ceasar, I suppose)
 >wounded in the thigh corresponds to old legends like Parsifal and the
 >Sangreal, The Grail King, The Fisher King, etc.  The theme of the
 >unhealed wound of the dying king (typically in the thigh, which may be a
 >euphemism for the groin) was later explored by the likes of Wagner and
 >Jung, but the old legends date to well before Shakespeare's time.

I don't have a dog in this wound, but consider Dionysus' birth from
Zeus' thigh... albeit his second birth.  Who else was earlier twice-born?

http://www.beloit.edu/~classics/main/courses/classics150/museum150/Dionysus_Bacchus/Birth_of_Dionysus_from_Zeus_Thigh_(Proto-Apulian_c_390BCE).htm

Least anyone doubt this, consider the birth of Athena...

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 18:31:34 +0000
Subject:        Bury my dagger at slashed thigh

Re: 15.1261.

Thanks for the leg work on euphemism but this is a different area
(although J C would be galvanized if a production had Caesar's missus
doing a Sharron Stone).

I saw a significant number of Spanish Gothic paintings (11th Century) in
a Barcelona Exhibition last week of the Crucifixion that had slash
wounds to the thighs of the thieves. This cannot be explained by
fractures to the tib and fib to hasten death as was apparently the
practice on a Friday night. But there is a hint of dishonour. Nor would
I think that Falstaff would be stabbing Hotspur's member but being coy
about it. However, he does have a bit of a warped sense of occasion.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael B. Luskin <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Jun 2004 14:39:46 EDT
Subject:        thighs and sighs

No one has yet mentioned the wrestling match between Jacob and an angel
(or God) on the banks of the Jabbok.  Jacob fought him all night, and
would not let him go until he blessed him.  His name was changed to
Israel, that is, He who contended with God.

The angel touched him on the thigh as he left, and Jacob/Israel was left
lame.

By the way, this is why thigh sinews are not kosher.

Michael B. Luskin

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