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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: June ::
Rhetorical Figure
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1287  Wednesday, 16 June 2004

[1]     From:   Alan Horn <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Jun 2004 17:56:04 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1268 Rhetorical Figure

[2]     From:   John Ramsay <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 01:14:36 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1268 Rhetorical Figure


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Horn <
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Date:           Tuesday, 15 Jun 2004 17:56:04 -0400
Subject: 15.1268 Rhetorical Figure
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1268 Rhetorical Figure

On Nancy Charlton's question about "no" figures: some of them are
correctio, some anthypophora, others relate to repetition or amplification.

Susan St. John writes:

"you never listen, you
or
I've got it all now, me

Does that bit of rhetoric have a name as well??"

Epanaleptic conduplicatio (for the first example), epanaleptic
polyptoton (for the second)?

Alan H

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 01:14:36 -0400
Subject: 15.1268 Rhetorical Figure
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1268 Rhetorical Figure

Susan St. John <
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 >I thought the original query was not "what is a litote?" (although I
 >didn't know and had to look it up), but rather, "what is the rhetorical
 >figure that is sort of opposite to a litote?"  Where the negative is
 >re-emphasized by the repetition of 'no' or 'not' after the statement.
 >
 >Something like:  I wouldn't do it, no, not I.
 >
 >And I was similarly curious about the addition of a pronoun for
 >emphasis...I can't come up with any actual quotes at the moment, but
 >it's something like:
 >I could do it, I
 >
 >or as I heard yesterday in a British film ("Little Voice" with Michael
 >Caine)
 >
 >you never listen, you
 >or
 >I've got it all now, me
 >
 >Does that bit of rhetoric have a name as well??
 >
 >Susan.

Repetition for emphasis.

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