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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: June ::
Thighs and Sighs
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1298  Thursday, 17 June 2004

[1]     From: Jack M Kamen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 10:51:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs

[2]     From:   Claude Caspar <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 12:27:08 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs

[3]     From:   SL Kasten MD <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 23:34:59 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack M Kamen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 10:51:15 -0500
Subject: 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs

Jay Feldman writes:

 >I am not a doctor, but I can tell you the very large femoral arteries
 >feed the huge muscles of the legs, which in turn with their powerful
 >contractions force the venous return to the heart. Strong legs to some
 >degree indicate good vascular health - perhaps the reason why their
 >shapely appearance is valued in Shakespeare. If severed high in the
 >groin, the bleeding would be profuse and probably impossible to stop
 >since there is no purchase above the cut for a tourniquet. Short of the
 >application of a very hot torch or coal to sear it, or an expert with a
 >clamp at hand, one could expect a very quick demise; hence its status as
 >a death wound. BTW, the tibiae and fibulae are found in the shin, the
 >femur is located in the thigh.

Blood loss can often be staunched in this situation by the use of very
firm direct pressure on the wound site using any material at hand, such
as a shirt or towel, in the absence of a sterile dressing which would be
preferable but is rarely immediately available at the place of injury.
This is only a temporary emergency measure, of course, to be used only
until expert assistance arrives.

Jack M Kamen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Caspar <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 12:27:08 -0400
Subject: 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs

 >>By the way, this is why thigh sinews are not kosher.<
 >
 >True. But it is also why the entire hind-quarters of otherwise kosher
 >mammals are not kosher.
 >
 >They can be made kosher by the careful and complete excision of the
 >sciatic nerve but this skill is rarely found today.

The mythy mind always finds a "why".  Ancient Greek culture allowed
women who have had children to become, again, actual, legal, virgins-
just a matter of definition, though utterly serious & consistent with
other aspects of Greek culture that ignored "nature" at will.

Perhaps a better analogy, Pythagoreans were famously vegan, but ate
parts of animals they simply defined as veggie, i.e., "kosher."  There
may be a real link here it would be worth researching... Anyone doubting
this can see Burkert, Vernant & Detienne's work, often cited & never
refuted.  [Aristotle, too, makes this point- see Burkert, p. 180-183,
Lore & Science in Ancient Pythagoreanism] Sorry, Shelley.

By the way, Buddha died from eating bad pork- vegan entered Buddhism
several hundred years after his lifetime- he would not have animals
butchered for him, but if served pork already prepared, enjoyed what was
offered.  This is His distinction & difference... Ask any real Buddhist-
this is part of the inner teaching, not a charge from without...

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           SL Kasten MD <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Jun 2004 23:34:59 +0200
Subject: 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1284 Thighs and Sighs

Greetings

Jay Feldman is absolutely right.  The femoral artery is a large vessel
running down the inner aspect of the upper thigh.  Cutting this vessel
can cause total blood loss with in a matter of minutes.  If the wound is
large enough the blood leaving the leg at arterial pressure as an
impressive fountain.  If the wound is small (e.g. ice pick)the blood may
seep into the layers of the thigh more slowly but with the same result.
  If the artery is cut through transversely the severed end closer to
the the heart may indeed retract and close itself.  Sadly, the most
common event is an accidental downward slash by a butcher or a drunken
assailant where the knife misses the target and continues into the
slashers own thigh, causing a significant longitudinal slash which does
not allow retraction.  First aid is putting one's full weight on one's
thumbs on the wound or in the wound if it is big enough, or over the
artery closer to the body until someone is available competent to tie
the artery.   Infection is a minor worry. A tourniquet may work if it is
broad enough to hold a suitable object firmly over the artery.

I don't think heat would be suitable.  That works for very small
arterioles, where the pressure is attenuated, and that have enough
muscle for retraction to work.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten

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