2004

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1313  Wednesday, 18 June 2004

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 18 Jun 2004 02:03:35 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1298 Thighs and Sighs

[2]     From:   Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 18 Jun 2004 11:42:49 +0000
        Subj:   A gentle scroll


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 18 Jun 2004 02:03:35 -0400
Subject: 15.1298 Thighs and Sighs
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1298 Thighs and Sighs

Percutaneous transluminal coronary angiography/angioplasty is typically
performed by cutting down the femoral artery proximal to the groin.  A
cannula is inserted to receive the wires which are threaded through the
arteries to the heart.  Usually, thousands of units of Heparin are
administered to reduce the viscosity of the blood, thus aggravating the
risk of exsanguination.  The cannula is left in the wound after the
procedure until the patient's coagulation rate has returned close to
normal.  It is then removed and direct pressure applied via a screw
press until the wound closes.  Sutures are not favored, as they reduce
the elasticity of the arterial wall and also complicate repeat
procedures.  Pressure is maintained for several hours by means of a
sandbag or similar weight while the leg is kept immobile.

The speed of exsanguination from a laceration of the femoral artery at
the groin is what makes bullfighting risky for the matador as well as
the bull.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 18 Jun 2004 11:42:49 +0000
Subject:        A gentle scroll.

" [...]If it is such? How could it not be? The song includes five words
that rhyme with lead: BRED, HEAD, nouriSHED, engend'RED; FED. [...]"

I appear to have overlooked this response nestling as it does within the
many others which do not address the original point.

How it could not be is explained in a number of essays.
Granville-Barker's little note in his Prefaces of some seven decades ago
would be a good place to begin reading. Thank you for explaining the
rhyme (and in big print too!). Weiss (not our current correspondent )
beat you to it in 1876 and several buffs have been into that casket
since in his support including Fox-Strangeways in the TLS between the wars.

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