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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: June ::
Lear
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1323  Monday, 21 June 2004

[1]     From:   Jack Heller <
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        Date:   Friday, 18 Jun 2004 09:19:35 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1312 Lear

[2]     From:   Brian Willis <
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        Date:   Sunday, 20 Jun 2004 05:48:49 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.1312 Lear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
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Date:           Friday, 18 Jun 2004 09:19:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 15.1312 Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1312 Lear

I had my first experience teaching a full semester course on Shakespeare
this spring, and I have to admit to being initially intimidated by the
prospect of teaching Lear. While I have some disagreements with Miller's
comments, mainly those Frank Whigham has expressed, I used the comments
to get the students talking about Lear, and the interaction was
thoughtful and successful. Since I'm guessing that someone on this
listserv first posted the link to Miller's comments, my thanks.

As You Like It, on the other hand, defeated me utterly in the classroom.

Jack Heller
Huntington College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <
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Date:           Sunday, 20 Jun 2004 05:48:49 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 15.1312 Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.1312 Lear

Although the questions raised here are admirable ones, they still ignore
the fact that Lear was written for performance and seems to have been
popular enough to have been printed in quarto. (If I'm not mistaken, it
was last Shakespeare play to reach the quarto format?) Yes, it is dense
and rich enough to be appreciated on the page (as Keats pointed out so
many times), but for all of its cosmic and epic features, it was crammed
into the wooden O. Successfully too, apparently.

Brian Willis

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