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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: June ::
But hear you, my Lord?
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.1346  Friday, 25 June 2004

[1]     From:   Graham Hall <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Jun 2004 18:37:32 +0000
        Subj:   cacoethes scribendi

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Jun 2004 14:46:07 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.1343 But hear you, my Lord?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Jun 2004 18:37:32 +0000
Subject:        cacoethes scribendi

Lest it be all Greek to some, compositor E setting Q1 from the Merlot
stained autograph draft manuscript of 15.1343 substituted "nous" within
"an ounce of common sense" while leaving the printing press on overtype.
Hypothermia then took hold and he compounded the error by placing the
pull with the Keeper of the King's Spellchecker. My thanks to the
hawk-eyed denizen who brought the typo to my attention and placed me in
the brig - and to any others who do so today.

To prevent such catastrophes my kalamos shall only be dipped into Pinot
Noir in future.

Harry VIII .TLN 2716-17.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Jun 2004 14:46:07 -0400
Subject: 15.1343 But hear you, my Lord?
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.1343 But hear you, my Lord?

Fear not, Graham Hall.

Neither plays nor playwrights die from disastrous productions. The one
lesson every playwright must learn is that no matter what happens (and
I'm including the actress who said, "We must be in the Twilight Zone"
every single time she forgot a line) , the script comes back, battered
but unbroken. Excised lines and rewritten scenes can be restored,
waiting for a better day, the favor of the gods, and a brave new director.

Shakespeare has withstood 400 years of misinterpretation, miscasting,
and mismanagement, and will still have festivals all over the world this
summer, next summer, and the summers after that.

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