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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: February ::
Greenblatt Discussion Forum
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0218  Tuesday, 2 February 2005

[1]     From:   Colin Cox <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 Jan 2005 12:08:29 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0199 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

[2]     From:   Colin Cox <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 Jan 2005 12:26:41 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0199 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

[3]     From:   David Basch <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 Jan 2005 16:00:21 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0185 Greenblatt Discussion Forum


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin Cox <
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Date:           Monday, 31 Jan 2005 12:08:29 -0800
Subject: 16.0199 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0199 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

 >Mr. Basch raises the intriguing notion that the addressee of the sonnets
 >was the lord.  Does anyone on the list know who the contemporary Earl of
 >Warwick was and whether Shakespeare might have had a relationship with
him?

If you start going down this path you'll be adding incest to the list.
The Warwicks were Ardens!

Colin Cox

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin Cox <
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Date:           Monday, 31 Jan 2005 12:26:41 -0800
Subject: 16.0199 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0199 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

 >Will inept scholars
 >skirt the inner meaning of the Sonnets and trade the true poet that has
 >created a magnificent work at the highest level of artistry and
 >profundity for a false shadow of one- this a pathetic, self-denigrating
 >man that is a slave to his passions, hopelessly in thrall to the love of
 >a vacuous, self-centered young man? Can it be believed that this is
 >Shakespeare?

I'm not a scholar and as one ensconced firmly on terra firma, I offer
you the opinion that if William had not been, "a pathetic,
self-denigrating man that is a slave to his passions" there would be no
canon or sonnets for us to debate.

Colin Cox

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Basch <
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Date:           Monday, 31 Jan 2005 16:00:21 -0500
Subject: 16.0185 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0185 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

The issues concerning Shakespeare are not what we prefer, but what this
great man was actually like. I think it makes a difference if such a
creative genius is riven with inner conflicts, is self-denigrating of
his greatness, and is in thrall to a self-centered young man. If we know
what the truth of this is, we then gain a greater understanding of the
poet's inner life and how this may or may not affect his contributions.

What seems to hang many persons up are the allusions to the "dear boy"
found in the Sonnets. This "dear boy" is obviously not the Lord. So how
do sonnets that address this "dear boy" co-exist with sonnets that
address the Lord? The answer is easy to contemplate when the allegory
that is presented in the Sonnets is recognized. It all fits together.

By the by, this allegory was was not invented by Shakespeare (or by me),
but was in existence for many centuries prior to Shakespeare. My book,
The Shakespeare Codes-some major research universities have long ago
obtained copies of this book, which is available to
students-methodically traces how, through uncovering the poet's devices
in his sonnets, it was possible to discover not only a variety of
persons addressed or alluded to, but also the allegory on which the
Sonnets was based.

Speaking of devices, here is another hidden message that the poet gave
that is pretty explicit, to be found in Sonnet 76. Here are the first
three lines of this poem:

      V  V Hy is my verse so barren of new pride?
           So far from variation or quicke change?
      Why with the time do I not glance aside

(Again I remind readers that in the original printing, the pair of "V"s
are printed double size.)

Now read the letters from right to left from the letter "y" of the first
word "Why" in line 1 to pick up "yHV" and then read down to pick up a
second "h" in "Why" of the third line straddled by the pair of "V"s
above. This now reads "yHVh"-the Tetragramaton itself.

Alternatively, read backwards from the "y" of "Why" in the third line
and then circle back to the left in the first line until the "H" of the
first word "VVHy." This now gives "yhWVVH," a version that includes both
versions of the letters V and W through which the Tetragramaton is
transliterated.

The poet repeats this feat again in the same sonnet in the following
vertical string as follows:

    [7]             y         |    everY
    [8]             h         |       tHeir
    [9]             w         |       sWeet
    [10]           a          |       And
    [11]          y           |     mY

This is a string that transliterates the Tetragramaton up and down the
way it is done in the first three lines and shows that all this in the
sonnet is the product of high design, not accident, and tells that it is
the Lord that is addressed.

Sonnet 76 is about verse written to the poet's Friend-verse that always
conveys the same message of the poet's unchanging love, in which he
merely dresses "old words new." Though some on this list may disagree, I
think it makes makes quite a difference in the nature of the poet that
is doing the addressing if this deep love addresses The Lord or a
vacuous young man.

In any case, let not those who preach a homosexual or bi-sexual
Shakespeare think they are in for a free ride on the subject since the
evidence is mounting up for a contrary opinion. This issue is hardly cut
and dried despite the academics who might think the issue is settled in
favor of a Shakespeare driven by uncontrollable non-normal drives.
Academics make mistakes too, big mistakes at that.

David Basch

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