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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: February ::
Greenblatt Discussion Forum
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0229  Thursday, 3 February 2005

[Editor's Note: This thread appears to me to be reaching its useful
conclusion. Would contributors please make final statements before I
close it.]

[1]     From:   M Yawney <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Feb 2005 11:45:43 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0218 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

[2]     From:   Peter Bridgman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Feb 2005 08:23:06 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0218 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

[3]     From:   Julia Crockett <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Feb 2005 11:58:41 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0185 Greenblatt Discussion Forum


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           M Yawney <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Feb 2005 11:45:43 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 16.0218 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0218 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

I am somewhat confused why Mr. Basch keeps referring to Shakespeare's
attraction to the lord as non-normal and unwholesome.

I think that most people who interpret the attraction erotically posit
it is as a normal and wholesome homosexual attraction. While I have
heard some attribute a dark sexuality to Shakespeare's involvement with
the dark lady, there is little, even in the most extreme interpretation
of the sonnets addressed to the young man, to suggest anything perverse
in this possible sexual attraction.

Mr. Basch gives no examples to support his assertion of something dark
in a more direct reading of the sonnets. Furthermore, if there is
something not-normal and unwholesome in the these sonnets when seen as
describing the poets relationship with a man, would not the some
non-normality and unwholesomeness still be there if we see the sonnets
as an allegory of poet's relationship with god? Mr. Basch does not
indicate that he sees the poems as describing such a disturbing
relationship with the divine, but surely the same content would be there
whomever the sonnets were addressed to.

Mr. Basch's perception of the relationship between Shakespeare and the
(human) lord strikes me as particularly odd since the Shakespeare that
Mr. Basch puts forward, one who encloses cryptic messages and embedded
clues in his writing, strikes me as a fairly unwholesome figure. At the
very least he is a more unwholesome Shakespeare than one who is writing
about the vagaries and turns of ordinary human relationships.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Feb 2005 08:23:06 -0000
Subject: 16.0218 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0218 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

David Basch writes ...

 >Now read the letters from right to left from the letter "y" of the first
 >word "Why" in line 1 to pick up "yHV" and then read down to pick up a
 >second "h" in "Why" of the third line straddled by the pair of "V"s
 >above. This now reads "yHVh"-the Tetragramaton itself.

Fascinating.  However, in the versions of the bible available to WS -
the Bishops and Geneva bibles - the tetragramaton was written 'Iehouah'.

Peter Bridgman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julia Crockett <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Feb 2005 11:58:41 -0000
Subject: 16.0185 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0185 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

Alastair Fowler reviews Will in the World in Times Literary Supplement,
4 February 2005 No5314. The piece highlights the fictive/factual,
speculative/historical boundaries of Greenblatt's peculiar brand of
creative scholarship, concluding rather impatiently, "How did the
intelligent Greenblatt come to write so sloppy a book?"

Cheers,
Julia

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