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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: February ::
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The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0327  Thursday, 17 February 2005

[Editor's Note: This thread has reached its useful end; anyone wishing
to make a concluding remark should do so for Friday's distribution.]

[1]     From:   Jack Heller <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2005 14:32:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0318 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

[2]     From:   Joachim Martill <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2005 18:40:00 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0318 Greenblatt Discussion Forum


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2005 14:32:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 16.0318 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0318 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

Hardy suggested some time ago that those posting on this thread should
their contributions to concluding remarks. Until that happens, let me
offer this suggestion: Every year at the Medieval Institute in
Kalamazoo, the best-attended session is conducted by the Pseudo Society.
Its state goals are to forge and restore the missing links in medieval
studies. Some of its published papers:

"Boethius on King Arthur: A Newly Discovered Text (1988)" by Maureen Fries

"Libri pontificales extravagantes (1989)" by Thomas F. X. Noble

"The San Gimignano Dossal and a Note on a New Discovery about the Pescia
Dossal (1989)" by William Cook

"Newly Discovered Danteana from the Biblioteca Bengodiana (1989)" by
Christopher Kleinhenz

"Artorius Rex Britanniae from a Contemporary Witness (1991)" by Richard
C. Hoffmann

"The Lost Letters of Charlemagne's First Wife, Autostrada, Also Called
Desiderata or Desideria (1991)" by Richard C. Ring

I think we should approach the Pseudo Society with a proposal to expand
or branch out into Shakespeareana. We can use postings on this thread
for its first contributions.

Jack Heller

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joachim Martill <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2005 18:40:00 EST
Subject: 16.0318 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0318 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

I have to point out that even at the height of the Yeshiva culture in
19th century Eastern Europe the vast majority of ethnic Ashkenazim had
little training if any in the Talmud.  If Shakespeare were Jewish, he
would most likely have been of ethnic Ibero-Berber background, and the
level of Talmudic training among Jews of that background was far lower
in the 15th century than the level of Talmudic learning was in 19th
century Poland.

Joachim Martill

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