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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: February ::
Othello's Name
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0387  Friday, 25 February 2005

[1]     From:   Colin Cox <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Feb 2005 09:37:01 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name

[2]     From:   Florence Amit <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Feb 2005 01:21:28 +0200
        Subj:   Othello's Name

[3]     From:   Julia Griffin <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Feb 2005 18:36:32 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name

[4]     From:   Bill Lloyd <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Feb 2005 23:49:45 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name

[5]     From:   John Drakakis <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Feb 2005 10:49:44 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin Cox <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Feb 2005 09:37:01 -0800
Subject: 16.0375 Othello's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name

  "I just had a student ask about the source and etymology of Othello's
name,"

Othello's original name, as penned by Giraldi, is Christoforo Moro,
Iago's is Alfiero. The root of the name in Greek means 'prosperous' and
in Spanish it means 'bold'.

Colin Cox

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Florence Amit <
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Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2005 01:21:28 +0200
Subject:        Othello's Name

Dear Mr. Cacicedo,

Shakespeare often used Hebrew labels for his characters. Othello's name
if read for Hebrew is Ot - sign , Ha El - God,   O -  his.   In other
words Othello, a Moor, was circumcised.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julia Griffin <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Feb 2005 18:36:32 -0500
Subject: 16.0375 Othello's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name

In Scenic Form in Shakespeare (1971), Emrys Jones made the interesting
suggestion that S. was influenced by Jonson's Thorello, in Every Man In
(1598 version): another unreasonably jealous husband.

Julia Griffin

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Lloyd <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Feb 2005 23:49:45 EST
Subject: 16.0375 Othello's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name

It's been suggested that the name Othello was Shakespeare's own coinage,
inspired by the name of the character Thorello in *Every Man in his
Humour*. Thorello was also a jealous husband and the play was acted by
Shakespeare's company. Since EMI was acted at court early in 1605, it
presumably had been recently revived by the King's men, and Othello is
usually dated 1604.

Bill Lloyd

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
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Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2005 10:49:44 -0000
Subject: 16.0375 Othello's Name
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0375 Othello's Name

Al Caciedo poses an interesting question. He might like to try the first
Quarto of Ben Jonson's Every Man in His Humour, and think upon the
subplot of the jealous merchant Thorello.  I notice that Bob Miola
mentions this in his fine Revels edition of the play.

Cheers,
John Drakakis

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