2005

CORIOLANUS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0352  Tuesday, 22 February 2005

From:           Harvey Roy Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 19:05:02 EST
Subject: 16.0338 CORIOLANUS
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0338 CORIOLANUS

Not a very good CORIOLANUS I am afraid. The subsidiary roles were
exchanged between actors and actresses of very little talent. The
Coriolanus lacked majesty, Volumnia was too nice by far, and in general
no one around was big enough for their respective roles.

Design terrible gray walls which were pounded on instead of music bah

In first half, as scenes unfolded, one person or another would
black-chalk onto one of the walls something apposite "Belly" etcetera.
  For reasons best known to the director, this conceit was absent in the
second half, which was certainly as chalkworthy as the first.

I haven't seen the play done often enough, and that's a shame. There was
a wild performance at the Public years ago, directed by Steven Berkoff,
that mad fellow. Christopher Walken played the big C, and was
extraordinary. The rest of the production as I recall was not up to his
level.

Heard the Burton version on tape, still have it, he is quite wonderful
that great speech about the absolute presumptuous 'shall'.....

Harvey Roy Greenberg MD

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BBC Radio Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0351  Tuesday, 22 February 2005

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 13:26:52 -0800
Subject: 16.0320 BBC Radio Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0320 BBC Radio Shakespeare

My thanks to those who answered both on-list and off. I have a follow-up
question. Who directed the BBC Radio Shakespeare productions of Antony
and Cleopatra (2002) and The Tempest (2001)? As before, answers to
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. will be most appreciated, but I shall also
check SHAKSPER in a few days.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

author site:
http://www.geocities.com/mikejensen16/michaelpjensen.html

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Was Shakespeare's Wife Literate?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0349  Tuesday, 22 February 2005

From:           D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 07:34:07 -0600
Subject: 16.0332 Was Shakespeare's Wife Literate?
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0332 Was Shakespeare's Wife Literate?

Peter Bridgman reminds us that

 >When Ben Jonson was sent to Newgate on a murder charge after killing a
 >fellow actor in a duel, Jonson claimed benefit of clergy and "wiped away
 >his offences" by reading the neck verse.  His thumb was then branded
 >with a 'T', and he was free to go home.  The 'T' was for Tyburn, to
 >remind the lucky "cleric" that the benefit only worked once and next
 >time he would swing.

I heard somewhere long ago that Jonson was "burned with a cold iron."
That is, the brand that was held to his thumb was not heated and thus he
was not branded at all. (He was able to arrange this because of
political connections at court.) Does someone on the list know which was
the case, or at least, which is the most accepted version?

Cheers,
don

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Venetian Usury

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0350  Tuesday, 22 February 2005

[1]     From:   Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2005 16:24:09 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0339 Venetian Usury

[2]     From:   Colin Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2005 09:02:29 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0339 Venetian Usury


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 16:24:09 -0000
Subject: 16.0339 Venetian Usury
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0339 Venetian Usury

HR Greenberg writes ...

 >I've learned that usury was practiced by Christians in Shakespeare's
 >England.

Were they Calvinists, i.e. Presbyterians?  The reason I ask is that both
Luther and Zwingli followed Rome in condemning all lending with
interest. Only Calvin permitted usury, and then only if the borrower was
rich.

Peter Bridgman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 09:02:29 -0800
Subject: 16.0339 Venetian Usury
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0339 Venetian Usury

 >I've learned that usury was practiced by Christians in Shakespeare's
 >England. Question: is it known whether usury was practiced by Christians
 >in Venice at Shakespeare's time.

I would suggest you investigate the Christian banks and the 'fondi,'
these institutions were notorious money-lenders.' They would
circumnavigate the 'usury' question by providing a 'service' (much like
modern banks!). Also they would make loans to Jewish money lenders as a
front.

Colin Cox

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"Slow, slow fresh fount"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0348  Tuesday, 22 February 2005

[1]     From:   Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2005 14:20:16 -0000
        Subj:   "Slow, slow fresh fount"

[2]     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2005 15:00:32 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.0335 "slow, slow fresh fount"

[3]     From:   Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2005 23:22:59 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0335 "slow, slow fresh fount"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 14:20:16 -0000
Subject:        "Slow, slow fresh fount"

Don't know about recordings or downloadable versions, but there's a
musical setting of this song in Henry Youll's _Canzonets for Three
Voices_ (1608).  See Mary Chan, _Music in the Theatre of  Ben Jonson_
(1980) for more details.

All the best,
Matt

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 15:00:32 -0000
Subject: 16.0335 "slow, slow fresh fount"
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0335 "slow, slow fresh fount"

There is a three-part setting by on Henry Youll, published in 1608 - but
it is generally assumed that this was not the setting used in the first
performance.  See Mary Chan, Music in the Theatre of Ben Jonson (Oxford,
1980), where it is printed and discussed pp. 49-54.

David Lindley

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2005 23:22:59 -0800
Subject: 16.0335 "slow, slow fresh fount"
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0335 "slow, slow fresh fount"

Harry Rusche asks:

 >A quick question: is there a musical setting for "slow, slow, fresh
 >fount" from "Cynthia's Revels"?  If so, does anyone know where I might
 >download an audio performance of the song?  You can answer me personally
 >if you wish.  Thanks.

I'm glad this came in on a holiday, because there's nothing I like more
than an excuse to browse through the labyrinth of Elizabethan song,
chanting as I go.

This web site, the Lied and Art Songs Text Page, lists two settings, one
by 18th century composer William Horsley, the other by 19th c. composer
Roger Quilter:

http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=8963

I also looked at Luminarium, hoping there might be a synth'ed setting on
the Jonson page, but alas, that page features a setting of The Three Ravens.

Nancy Charlton

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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