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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: January ::
Greenblatt Discussion Forum
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0040  Monday, 10 January 2005

[1]     From:   Peter Holland <
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        Date:   Saturday, 8 Jan 2005 05:01:46 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

[2]     From:   Julia Crockett <
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        Date:   Friday, 7 Jan 2005 18:40:46 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Holland <
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Date:           Saturday, 8 Jan 2005 05:01:46 -0500
Subject: 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

When I wrote a review of Greenblatt's book, I mentioned that I couldn't
recall ever coming across the idea that Greene was a source for
Falstaff. Since then I have been reminded by colleagues that Jonathan
Bate mentions it in *The Genius of Shakespeare* and that Baldwin Maxwell
suggested it in a short note in Studies in Philology in 1930. Both made
the suggestion in the offhand way that suggests they placed no weight on
the proposal. Both therefore seem far wiser than Greenblatt in his
strangely emphatic approach to the idea.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julia Crockett <
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Date:           Friday, 7 Jan 2005 18:40:46 -0000
Subject: 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

The best reading of Falstaff I have come across is Walter Kaiser's
Praisers of Folly where the wise-fool is situated - not in the
ironed-shirt rhetoric of new historicism - but in a Platonic
philosophical tradition of serio-ludere and folly-inspired divine
laughter which includes Erasmus, More, Rabelais, Spenser, Shakespeare,
Milton, Swift et al.

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