2005

New BBC Complete Works?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0100  Wednesday, 19 January 2005

From:           Susanne Greenhalgh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Jan 2005 09:24:26 -0000
Subject:        New BBC Complete Works?

The Guardian (17/1/05) has a report 'What the Dickens is going on at the
BBC' on 'four Shakespeare-inspired contemporary films, Taming of the
Shrew, Macbeth, Midsummer Night's Dream and Much Ado About Nothing,
which will be freely retold in the spirit of the recent Chaucer
adaptations.' Laura Mackie, new head of drama and series, signals 'the
beginning of a new commitment to Shakespeare, with other [existing]
Shakespeare films screened on BBC2 and 4, arts programmes, and a link to
a Shakespeare event for school children.' This may include eventual
adaptation of the entire Shakespeare canon.  The frame of reference for
the 4 commissioned plays appears to be British celebrity/media culture -
Kate as a young politician, Macbeth set in a Gordon-Ramsay style kitchen
(no shortage of sharp implements ...), MND set in the 'Center Parcs-like
Dream Parks' and Beatrice and Benedick as a TV talkshow couple.

Susanne Greenhalgh

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

"About Shakespeare" Radio Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0099  Wednesday, 19 January 2005

From:           Bruce Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jan 2005 16:08:03 -0700
Subject:        "About Shakespeare" Radio Series

The "About Shakespeare" radio series is being rebroadcast on KBYU-FM
over the next few weeks.  Some of you have heard it already; I think all
of you would be pleased by the quality of the programs, each of which
lasts 30 minutes.  (I can affirm the quality of most of the broadcasts
but can't vouch for two of them, which feature me.)  You can listen via
the Internet at http://kbyufm.org/streaming/

The discussions are broadcast every Thursday evening at 9:00pm MDT
(that-just to help everyone with the math-would be 11pm EDT, 10pm CDT,
and 8pm PDT).

The programs are

Jan. 20: Wise Laughter: How Shakespeare Marries Meaning and Merriment
John Tanner, BYU Department of English

Jan 27: Child Brides, Arranged Marriages, and Brutal Fathers:
Misconceptions about Family in Shakespeare
Bruce Young, BYU Department of English

Feb. 3: Shakespeare on Stage . . . Minus the Actors
Rory Scanlon, BYU Department of Theatre and Media Arts

Feb. 10: Times, How They've Changed!: Shakespeare Lands in the
Twenty-First Century
Gary Taylor, Editor of The Complete Works of Shakespeare, Oxford
Edition, 1986

Feb. 17: Leave Your Reverence at the Door: An Elizabethan Afternoon at
the Theatre
Chris Clark, Utah Valley State College Department of Theatre

Feb. 24: Shakespeare on Canvas: Dramatic Moments Frozen in Time Art
Bassett, Emeritus, BYU Department of Humanities, Classics, and
Comparative Literature

March 3: Dramas of Atonement: Shakespeare's Last Plays
John S. Tanner, BYU Department of English

March 10: Are There Happy Families in Shakespeare?
Bruce Young, BYU Department of English

March 17: How Many Hamlets Can There Be?: What Film Actors Have Done to
the Danish Prince
Brandie Siegfried, BYU Department of English

March 24: The Sweet Power of Music: Songs in Shakespeare
Nancy Christiansen, BYU Department of English

March 31: 'Speak the Speech, I Pray You': Every Actor Needs a Coach
Barta Heiner, BYU Department of Theatre and Media Arts

April 7: The Sweet Smoke of Rhetoric: Playful Eloquence in Shakespeare
Gideon Burton, BYU Department of English

April 14: Women Characters in Shakespeare: A panel discussion
Sharon Swenson (Moderator), Nancy Christiansen, Barta Heiner, Char
Nelson, Brandie Siegfried, Sally Taylor (BYU Departments of English, and
Theatre and Media Arts)

Happy listening.

Bruce Young

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Greenblatt Discussion Forum

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0097  Tuesday, 18 January 2005

[1]     From:   Bill Lloyd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jan 2005 15:09:26 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0031 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

[2]     From:   David Basch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 17 Jan 2005 13:43:11 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Lloyd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 13 Jan 2005 15:09:26 EST
Subject: 16.0031 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0031 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

The immediate 'model' for Oldcastle/Falstaff is well-known. It is the
character "Jockey" in the HenryIV/V source play *Famous Victories of
Henry V* as performed by Tarlton and the Queen's Men in the 1580s.
Jockey [=John] is the the leader of the Prince's dissolute companions,
has a run-in with the Lord Chief Justice, and other proto-Falstaffian
activities. This figure, combined with the traditional character of the
'miles gloriosus'-- check out, for instance, Captain Crackstone in
*Fedele & Fortunio* [1584]-- should be enough to engender Falstaff in
the fertile brain of whatsisname.

The connections between Greene and Falstaff are that they drank a lot,
consorted with whores, and toyed with repentance. Surely there needs no
ghost, be it Greene or John Shakespeare, come from the grave to give
Shakespeare's character those common features.

By the way, I'd like to point out that the names Falstaff and
Shakespeare both derive from the Welsh. Falstaff is from 'ffael'=fault
and 'stofi'=weave or woven, that is 'one who is made up of sins'. And
Shakespeare derives from 'seci'= to stuff and 'siapri'=jest, that is,
'stuffed with jests' [as was John Shakespeare]. In fact, it was reported
that old John claimed he 'durst crack a jest' with Will anytime, and
I've seen with my own eyes a picture of John and his son sitting at the
kitchen table telling jokes to a sourfaced Anne Hathaway. Since the
Welsh are one of the lost tribes of Israel and [as any good Welshman
will tell you] Welsh was the language of Adam and Even in the garden of
Eden, this all supports David Basch's Shakespeare is Jewish theory.

Bill Lloyd

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Basch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Jan 2005 13:43:11 -0500
Subject: 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0026 Greenblatt Discussion Forum

Concerning discussions of Stephen Greenblatt's book, WILL IN THE WORLD,
I just finished reading it. It was a good read-well written,
interesting, informative, but, nevertheless, with its limitations.

Greenblatt is certainly resourceful and excellent in connecting the dots
between the historical, sociological, psychological, and literary
factors to construct from really ambiguous material a picture of what he
thinks the great poet confronted in his society and what he was
personally like. While these insights are interesting, many are far from
definitive.

Greenblatt and other such "dot connectors" must recognize that they
might not be aware of all the "dots" that need connection.  Also, they
must recognize that a trademark of the poet is in his having his
characters speak in ways authentic to themselves.  Thus, it is not
conclusive to put the words and sentiments of a character into the
poet's head, though sometimes a case can be made for it, as in the case
he cites of the mother who so movingly lamented the loss of her son-the
way Shakespeare must certainly have done for the loss of his son Hamnet.
The latter observation would be backed up by the line or two spoken by
the doomed young boy, Prince Mamillius, in the Winters Tale, in which
the lad reveals a precocious talent for story telling. I would note that
the lad's name,

Mamillius, can be read as the Yiddish expression "momalas"-"mother's
little one."
In another instance cited by Greenblatt is the remark from The Two
Gentlemen of Verona, to whit, "A Jew would have wept to see them part."
This has the flavor of double entendre about it. On the one hand it
reflects the character's opinion-a product of his period-about the
alleged genetic, unfeeling nature of Jews.  But when this is read as a
direct statement, it says something altogether opposite, possibly a
message from the great poet who recognizes Jewish capacity for
compassion. In the same way, Greenblatt's citation of Benedict's remark
about Beatrice that, "If I don't love her, I am a Jew," need not be
considered an insult to Jewry but as a realistic understanding of the
Jew's obligation to marry within his own group. The limitations of
Greenblatt's methodology shows itself starkly in his assumption from the
Sonnets that Shakespeare is some kind of homosexual or bisexual. That
conclusion depends on who you think his friend [or friends] is/are, as
addressed in his Sonnets. Greenblatt thinks the main friend is Henry
Wriothesley -- who is not specifically identified in the Sonnets. It
does not occur to Greenblatt-it is probably beyond his frame of
reference-that the poet's friend is entirely other. Consider Sonnet 29,
one of the great poems of the world in power of expression and in the
moving love expressed in it:

                     29

[1]   VV Hen in disgrace with Fortune and mens eyes,
[2]      I all alone beweepe my out-cast state,
[3]   And trouble deafe heauen with my bootlesse cries,
[4]   And looke vpon my selfe and curse my fate.
[5]   Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
[6]   Featur'd like him,like him with friends possest,
[7]   Desiring this mans art,and that mans skope,
[8]   With what I most inioy contented least,
[9]   Yet in these thoughts my selfe almost despising,
[10]  Haplye I thinke on thee, and then my state,
[11]  (Like to the Larke at breake of daye arising)
[12]  From sullen earth sings himns at Heauens gate,
[13]     For thy sweet loue remembred such welth brings,
[14]     That then I skorne to change my state with Kings.

This sonnet falls flat in some eyes when it is thought to refer to
nothing else but the narcissistic young man that most commentators,
including Greenblatt, think it does. But when it is recognized that the
poet is here addressing The Lord as his Friend, the magnificence of this
sonnet as a religious expression of love to God becomes
overwhelming-goodbye homosexual thesis.  Such a thought is foreign to
Greenblatt, Vendler, Booth, and the rest of today's experts on the
Sonnets. But if you access the hidden communcations Shakespeare
gave-Shakespeare's many types of "codes," as I have discovered and have
disclosed in my book, THE SHAKESPEARE CODES-the matter becomes transparent.

One of these communications on the identity of Shakespeare's Friend is
through the parallel sentiments expressed in Psalm 29 -- the sister of
the sonnet in number. The last line of the psalm, which heralds the
majesty of the Lord, declares that "the Lord will give his people
strength, the Lord will give his people peace." Is that not what happens
in the sonnet to the poet when the poet thinks of his Friend? His
thinking on his Friend has given him strength and that gives him the
peace expressed to serenely accept his state.

Another coded communication appears in a divided configuration of
letters Y-H-W-A, that show up in the first letters of various line sets
of the sonnet that transliterate the Bible's name for God-lines 9 to 10
and 5 to 4. A second transliteration shows up in another similar divided
configuration on lines 11 and 12 as "y-H-vae"

                                 y
                                Heau

This is read by reading y-H catty corner and reading backward the "uae"
with the "u," which is a "v," sounded as "v." Resourceful investigators
can come up with many more such transliterations in the sonnet using a
copy of the original printed version-too many versions to be accounted
simply to accident.

I was not to first to find the "code of parallelism" to Psalms in the
Sonnets-one of numerous kinds of codes or hidden communication-as a clue
to meaning. The late Professor Leslie Hotson of Yale cited five such
parallels and believed that it authenticated the numbering of the
sonnets as coming from the poet-otherwise such parallels would be
lost-and this suggested to him depths to the meaning of the Sonnets that
remained to be probed.

In short, while Professor Greenblatt provides interesting insights to
the period's history and context of the poet, for all his erudition and
scope, his insights remain in some cases incomplete if not misleading.

David Basch

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Conference Announcement

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0098  Wednesday, 19 January 2005

From:           Matt Nickerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jan 2005 13:49:18 -0700
Subject:        Conference Announcement

Wooden O Symposium
August 1-4, 2005
Southern Utah University -- Utah Shakespearean Festival
Cedar City, Utah  84720
USA

***  C A L L    F O R   P A P E R S ***

The Wooden O Symposium is a cross disciplinary conference exploring
Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern Studies, through the text and
performance of Shakespeare's plays.  Scholars from all disciplines are
encouraged to submit papers that offer insights and new ideas springing
from the era and works of William Shakespeare.   His plays are replete
with the language, thoughts, and arts of the Renaissance and Western
culture and represent an inexhaustible source for creative ideas and
research.

Papers are accepted from professional scholars, graduate students,
undergraduates, and aficionados.  All submissions are subject to the
same academic peer review process.

Conference Priorities

The Wooden O Symposium is hosted by Southern Utah University, home of
the Tony Award- winning Utah Shakespearean Festival, which will be
presenting Romeo and Juliet, Love's Labour's Lost, A Midsummer's Night
Dream, and Marlowe's Doctor Faustus as part of its summer 2005 season.
Priority for papers/presentations at the conference will be given to
research relating to one or more of these specific works.  Scholars
attending the conference will have the unique opportunity of immersing
themselves in research, text, and performance in one of the most
beautiful natural settings in the western U.S.

Selected papers from the symposium are published in the peer-reviewed
Journal of the Wooden O Symposium.

Submissions are accepted through email or post.  All submissions must
include the author's name, mailing address, email address,
college/university affiliation (if any) and day time phone number.  The
deadline for submissions is April 1, 2005.  Send 250 word abstract or
complete paper to:

Wooden O Symposium
c/o Utah Shakespearean Festival
351 W. Center St.
Cedar City, UT 84720
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://www.woodenosymposium.org

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Prince Hal in the News Again

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0096  Tuesday, 18 January 2005

[1]     From:   Stephen C. Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 17 Jan 2005 09:55:04 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0084 Prince Hal in the News Again

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 17 Jan 2005 15:36:58 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.0084 Prince Hal in the News Again


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen C. Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Jan 2005 09:55:04 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 16.0084 Prince Hal in the News Again
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0084 Prince Hal in the News Again

The Prince Hal of yore went downhill when he attained Kingly status, not
unlike others one might name.

Best, S

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Jan 2005 15:36:58 -0500
Subject: 16.0084 Prince Hal in the News Again
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0084 Prince Hal in the News Again

President Bush is not Prince Hal. He's more RIII of the "smile and be a
villain" ilk. Also, RIII had a habit of photo op moments with people
about to be offed that is very Georgish. If George puts an arm around
you for a camera shot, your funding is about to be cut. And wasn't RIII
a usurper, too?

Prince Harry's not Hal either. Hal didn't blame Daddy for getting rid of
Mommy.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.