2005

Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0179  Friday, 28 January 2005

[1]     From:   Alan J. Sanders <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 07:41:02 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

[2]     From:   Fran Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 08:34:16 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

[3]     From:   Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 08:38:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

[4]     From:   Rainbow Saari <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Jan 2005 02:47:55 +1300
        Subj:   Re; solving the M.O.A.I riddle

[5]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 14:04:45 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

[6]     From:   William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 20:18:43 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan J. Sanders <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 07:41:02 -0500
Subject: 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

Seeking an answer to this puzzle is always a bit of a fun mental
exercise and by going back to the play, I wonder if Will was just
playing around with the spelling of Malvolio.  If we follow a pattern
that says, take the first letter in the name then the last letter, we
get M and O.  Now, assuming Will erased those letters from Malvolio's
name (he likely had a scratch pad and was playing around to make this
riddle work in the context of the play), the remaining letters are:
alvoli.  So, he followed the same pattern and pulled the first letter
and the last letter and now we have the A and the I.  I suppose, he may
have initially went through the exercise a third time and would have
added L and L.  MOAILL.  Looking at it, Will probably thought that it
looked just plain silly and dropped the double L's in favor of just the
first four letters.  After all, he had a few more scenes left to finish!

At least, that's one hypothetical response.   :-)

Alan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 08:34:16 EST
Subject: 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

A wild guess that O is for "or", as in "the fashion or Italian
appearance".  Interesting question.

Fran Barasch

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 08:38:20 -0500
Subject: 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

 >Dear Friends,
 >
 >I wonder if those who have Italian (or those who do not) would care to
 >join in trying to solve the riddle of the meaning of M.O.A.I. in TN?

Hate to be dull-witted about it, but for me the letters are just four
letters from Malvolio's name rearranged to allow us to watch Malvolio's
slow mind at work figuring out what name they might mean.  "M. A. I. O."
would, I think, seem too easy, even for Malvoio; hence the
rearrangement.  Your solution seems strained, something I can't imagine
many spectators trying to find, much less coming up with.  And a joking
riddle for the immensely sophisticated here would compete with what
seems to me the focus of the scene--Malovolio's discovery that Olivia is
in love with him.

--Bob G.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rainbow Saari <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Jan 2005 02:47:55 +1300
Subject:        Re; solving the M.O.A.I riddle

What an interesting idea. My guess would be ' Occidentale' as used by
Florio ( quoted from the EMEDD:
(Florio 1598 @ 3471891)

Occidentale, westerly, of the West, of the west part

though a grammatically correct version  of  'Occastro, a wild goose'
(also Florio) tempts me as a second option. I'd certainly hunt in
Florio's dictionaries for your term, Steve.

Cheers,
Ms Rainbow Saari

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 14:04:45 -0500
Subject: 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

How about "Occidentale"; or maybe, in the opposite sense, "Ottomani."

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 20:18:43 -0500
Subject: 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0163 Solving the M.O.A.I. Riddle

How about M[aria] [+] O[livia] A[re] I? Malvolio is being warned that
the writing style which appears to be Olivia's is really Maria's, and
that they are in a sense one. Earlier in the play Maria plays Olivia.

It is interesting that Olivia, Viola, Malvolio, and Maria share so many
letters. If you cross out all the shared letters, duplicates included,
there's not much left.

Steve may be right about the Italian connection, but my Italian is short
and unacceptable in scholarly company.

Bill

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Did the Bard Have Syphilis?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0178  Friday, 28 January 2005

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 13:24:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 16.0169 Did the Bard Have Syphilis?
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0169 Did the Bard Have Syphilis?

It explains no such thing. Two Noble Kinsmen, Henry VIII, and perhaps
the missing Cardenio were still to follow.

Heller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Date of King John

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0176  Friday, 28 January 2005

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 17:33:15 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0172 Date of King John

[2]     From:   Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 13:18:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0172 Date of King John


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 17:33:15 -0000
Subject: 16.0172 Date of King John
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0172 Date of King John

John Klause argued that Shakespeare's King John was influenced by a
number of works by the Jesuit Robert Southwell ("New sources for
Shakespeare's King John: The writings of Robert Southwell" Studies in
Philology 98 (2001) pp. 401-27). Klause found verbal parallels between
Louis the Dauphin's language about loving Lady Blanche because he is
reflected in her eyes and Southwell's poem Saint Peters Complaint on
Christ's eye, and perhaps the Bastard's mocking of it with images of
hanging, drawing, and quartering (1.2.497-510) draws on Shakespeare's
knowledge that Southwell himself was hanged, drawn, and quartered in
1595 (pp. 404-5).

Klause listed a collection of collocations linking Saint Peter's
Complaint and King John (pp. 406-7) and argued that the latter also owes
something to Southwell's Epistle of Comfort, since King John's use of a
couple of biblical quotations (from Psalms and Galatians) is odd until
we realize that Southwell too put them together. Likewise the language
of the scene in front of the walls of Angiers follows Epistle of
Comfort's description of the destruction of Jerusalem, and there are
some looser connections too (pp. 408-17). Cardinal Pandulph's speech to
the French king in 3.1 about which of several obligations in an oath
must be kept comes from the Epistle of Comfort and Shakespeare's writing
just after John's defiance of Pandulph (3.1) borrows a lot of words and
phrases from Epistle of Comfort, none of which matches what is in
Troublesome Reign, although for the actual defiance Troublesome Reign
matches King John closely. Klause explored some phrases that Epistle of
Comfort, Troublesome Reign, and King John have in common and observed
that Epistle of Comfort "shares nothing of significance with TR except
what King John has in common with both works", so there's no possibility
of descent by Epistle of Comfort to Troublesome Reign to King John, but
there might be linear descent by Epistle of Comfort to King John to
Troublesome Reign or else Epistle of Comfort to King John and
Troublesome Reign to King John (p. 417n21).

Another Southwell work, An Humble Supplication, circulating in
manuscript also "scatters its language throughout Shakespeare's play"
and it was written in response to a government proclamation against
Catholics of November 1591, and Klause listed the (rather weak) verbal
parallels (pp. 419-22). Klause suspected that the putting out of
Arthur's eyes (as a means to kill him) with hot irons came from
Southwell too. In Troublesome Reign Pandulph says that whoever kills the
king will be forgiven the sin, but that is doctrinally flawed from a
Catholic point of view since forgiveness requires contrition of the
sinner, religious authority is not enough, and it certainly cannot
forgive before the fact; thus Shakespeare (presumably informed by
Southwell) changed this so that killing the king is a virtue not a sin
at all (p. 424). If these borrowings are accepted, the earliest date for
King John is whenever An Humble Supplication was written, and since An
Humble Supplication was a response to a proclamation of November 1591,
King John cannot be earlier than, say, December 1591. Just possibly,
King John was written early in 1592 (counting January-December) and was
imitated in Troublesome Reign, which got into performance and print
before 25 March 1592, in which case its title-page dating of 1591 is
counting March-March (p. 425n34).

Those who are comfortable with stylometric as opposed to purely poetic
evidence might find be interested in MacDonald P. Jackson's essay "Pause
patterns in Shakespeare's verse: Canon and chronology" (Literary and
Linguistic Computing 17 (2002) pp. 36-47). It rather niftily confirms
the Oxford Shakespeare order of the play (although not the absolute
dates) and finds that King John has strong link with A Midsummer Night's
Dream (1595), Romeo and Juliet (1595), Love's Labour's Lost (1594-5),
The Comedy of Errors (1594), and Richard 2 (1595), so it can be dated
about 1595 if the Oxford dating of these other plays is right; hence
Troublesome Reign (printed 1591) was a source not a copy of King John.

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 13:18:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 16.0172 Date of King John
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0172 Date of King John

A few summers ago, I worked on sixteenth century perceptions and
presentations of King John, the historical person, not just the play.
This discussion reminds me of my wish to return to that work.

When we speak of a source, let's think of source of provocation as well
as source of material to incorporate into one's own work. The
Troublesome Reigne seems closely tied in its language to the narrative
of King John in John Foxe's Acts and Monuments (Book of Martyrs). The
narrative in Foxe's text is probably not by Foxe himself, but by John
Bale, who also wrote a morality play, King Johan, making history into
allegory.

Dating of Shakespeare King John splits between those who follow
Honigmann and those who favor the mid1590s. The problem seems impossible
to resolve precisely, but I view The Troublesome Reigne as a provocation
to Shakespeare's play: The plays are far apart ideologically, Peele
(probably) presenting a proto-protestant martyr, Shakespeare a would-be
Machiavel who didn't have the cajones to be a Richard III. The earliest
medieval histories I have found make John to be vicious and tyrannical.

I hope more Shakespeareans will read this play. I find it hugely
undervalued and very timely.

Jack Heller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare and the Invention of Metaphor and

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0177  Friday, 28 January 2005

From:           Bonnie Melchior <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jan 2005 11:59:23 -0600
Subject: 16.0157 Shakespeare and the Invention of Metaphor and
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0157 Shakespeare and the Invention of Metaphor and
Language

 >Tim Carroll and Douglas Galbi want us to suppose that there is
 >something
 >either personally or historically unique about the metaphoric language
 >in Shakespeare. Modern cognitive science, however, is busy
 >demonstrating
 >that making metaphors-and especially using metaphors to relate our
 >individual experience to recurrent natural and social phenomena as
 >perceived and reported by others ("links to more abstract ideas") is a
 >fundamental human mental activity. From the literary angle see
 >especially the work of Mark Turner (*The Literary Mind*, *Death is the
 >mother of Beauty*) and Gilles Fauconier (*The Way we Think*), which
 >offer good introductions. Shakespeare may have been particularly good
 >at
 >doing it; early modern Europeans put formal training in rhetoric at
 >the
 >center of their educational theory and practice. But the process
 >itself,
 >if the cognitive chaps are right, belongs to all of us.
 >
 >David Evett

I would like to add a footnote to what David Evett said in the above
post:  metaphor, in modern  linguistic studies,  has been seen as an
essential and basic feature of all  language.  It is not "decoration,"
and it is not a trope peculiar to "literature."  See  *Metaphors We Live
by*,  by George Lakoff and Mark Johnson.

Bonnie Melchior

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

UPDATE: British Shakespeare Association Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0175  Friday, 28 January 2005

From:           Kate Chedgzoy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Jan 2005 09:05:00 -0000
Subject:        UPDATE: British Shakespeare Association Conference 2005 (UK)
(3/1/05; 9/1/05-9/4/05)

UPDATE: British Shakespeare Association Conference 2005 (UK) (10/1/04;
9/1-4/05)

This is the second call for papers for the 2005 BSA conference.

Colleagues are now invited to submit proposals for contributions to the
14 seminars, on a wide range of topics, that form a central plank of the
conference programme.  Reflecting the variety of subjects and approaches
covered by the seminars, contributions need not necessarily take the
form of conventional academic papers; please pay particular attention to
the specific suggestions of individual seminar organisers.

Details of the seminars are available at
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/shakespeare/cfp.htm, and on the BSA website,
http://www.britishshakespeare.ws.

All responses to this call should be directed to the organisers of the
particular seminar in which you are interested.

Professor Kate Chedgzoy
Director of NIASSH
University of Newcastle
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU.
Tel. +44 (0)191 222 6000 / Fax +44 (0)191 222 8708
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/elll/staff/profile/kate.chedgzoy

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.