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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: March ::
Greenblatt Reviewed in The Guardian
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0414  Friday, 4 March 2005

[1]     From:   Tom Dale Keever <
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        Date:   Saturday, 26 Feb 2005 14:48:40 -0500
        Subj:   Greenblatt Reviewed in The Guardian

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <
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        Date:   Saturday, 26 Feb 2005 08:05:25 -0500
        Subj:   Stephen Greenblatt studied at Yale . . .


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 26 Feb 2005 14:48:40 -0500
Subject:        Greenblatt Reviewed in The Guardian

I know we've moved off this thread, but some of us may not regularly
check The Guardian on line and they just got around to reviewing
Greenblatt's book.

Here's where to find it:

http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,12084,1424576,00.html

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
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Date:           Saturday, 26 Feb 2005 08:05:25 -0500
Subject:        Stephen Greenblatt studied at Yale . . .

The human factor

Stephen Greenblatt studied at Yale and Cambridge before challenging
orthodox literary theory with 'new historicism', which brought him
academic success and guru status among students. But to some his new
biography of Shakespeare represents apostasy and a return to a
traditionalist agenda

http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/features/story/0,11710,1425642,00.html

Lucasta Miller
Saturday February 26, 2005
The Guardian

In 1995, in the early days of the Monica Lewinsky scandal, the literary
scholar and cultural theorist, Stephen Greenblatt, had a momentary
encounter with Bill Clinton at a White House reception. Clinton recalled
being made to learn Macbeth at school. "Don't you think," said
Greenblatt, "it's a play about someone compelled to do the morally
disastrous?" "No," said Clinton, "it's a play about someone whose
immense ambition has an ethically inadequate object." This insight,
captured in such a "marvellous phrase", dazzled Greenblatt into thinking
the president had missed his vocation as an English professor,
especially when Clinton went on to quote reams of Macbeth by heart. Some
time later, though, watching the TV news, he heard Clinton praise the
late King Hussein of Jordan as a man "whose immense ambition had an
ethically adequate object". Clinton's marvellous phrase, it turned out,
was no more than multi-purpose rhetoric. "It suddenly occurred to me,"
Greenblatt recalls, "that although the phrase was marvellous, it was
also somehow off. No one with immense ambition has an ethically adequate
object. I realised that Clinton had chosen the right vocation after all!"

[ . . . ]

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