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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: March ::
There's Magic in the Web
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0426  Tuesday, 8 March 2005

[1]     From:   Elliott Stone <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:05:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web

[2]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:47:45 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elliott Stone <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:05:35 -0500
Subject: 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web

Strawberries on the Othello handkerchief are a sexual symbol rather than
a peace symbol. But whatever works!

Elliott H. Stone

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:47:45 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web

John Webb writes, "Five actors focus on the journey of a sumptuous
Islamic handkerchief, Othello's first love token to his wife, and trace
Othello's growing distrust of Desdemona's fidelity. In the play he kills
her. In "There's Magic in the Web", the students are asked by Desdemona
to prove her innocence."

Over here, in the States, as in *United States,* a person is "innocent
until proven guilty," and so, in our minds as readers, there is no
burden of proof upon the victim in *Othello* to prove anything.  We
would be asking of Othello his proof of his lady's guilt in his eyes?

So, I ask, in Shakespeare's time, in Law, was there a burden upon
victims of an accusation to prove their innocence?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

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